Oct 22, 2021  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 The department offers selected courses from this catalog as warranted by student needs and availability of faculty. Specific offerings for each term may be found in the Schedule of Classes.

Course Renumbering Project

Effective the Fall 2017 semester, all undergraduate and graduate courses at Oakland University were renumbered from 3 digits to 4 digits.

Most subject codes will remain the same, but the new four-digit course numbers may in some cases be similar to the previous three-digit course numbers and in other cases be different because academic departments have resequenced their course numbers.

Follow this link to the conversion list.

This searchable PDF is a guide to see how the course numbers have changed. Each row represents a course, and the columns represent: the subject code, the previous three-digit course number,and the new four-digit course number for that course, beginning in Fall 2017.

To search this PDF for a specific course using the old number, you can just hit “Control” (or “Command” if on Mac) and “F,” then type in a specific course (e.g. “WRT 160”) to find the new course number .

The following subject codes have changed:

  • Studio Art (SA) changed to (ART)
  • Some English (ENG) courses changed to Creative Writing (CW)
  • Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) and Computer and Information Technology (CIT) changed to Computer Science and Informatics (CSI)
  • Music Theory and Composition (MUT) changed to either Applied Music (MUA) or Musicology and Music Education (MUS)
  • (MLS) changed to (CDS)
  • Some (JRN) courses changed to (PR)

For more information, please contact your academic adviser. Graduate students, please contact your academic department for advising.

NOTE: If you enrolled or transferred after fall 2014 please be sure to search the 2017-18 catalog courses and review the 3 to 4 digit conversions list.

 

Accounting

  
  •  

    ACC 2000 - Introductory Financial Accounting

    (4)
    Introduction to accounting information as an aid to decisionmaking for external users of financial statements. Students learn how to measure and record accounting data, prepare financial statements and analyze published financial accounting information.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1554  prior to or concurrent with ACC 2000 or [MIS 1000  and WRT 1060  and (MTH 1221  or MTH 1222  or MTH 1441 )] with a minimum grade of (C) in each course
  
  •  

    ACC 2100 - Managerial and Cost Accounting I

    (4)
    Analysis of accounting methods providing data for optimal managerial decisions, implementation and control. Topics include cost allocation; cost, volume and price relationships; product cost accounting and control systems; operations and capital budgeting, and related behavioral, reporting and information processing aspects.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2000  and MTH 1221  or MTH 1222  or MTH 1441  or MTH 1554  with a minimum grade of (C) in each course. MIS 1000  is recommended.
  
  •  

    ACC 3000 - Survey of Accounting

    (4)
    Introduction to financial and managerial accounting. Introduces the measurement systems used to control and evaluate business activities. It also explores product costing systems and using accounting data as a basis for management planning and decision making. Business majors, pre-business students and business undecided students cannot take this course.
    Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing.
  
  •  

    ACC 3010 - Financial Reporting and Analysis

    (3)
    A study of financial accounting and reporting from the perspective of the user of accounting information. The course will emphasize the interpretation and analysis of specific accounting treatments rather than accounting methodology. Recommend FIN 3220  prior to or concurrent with ACC 3010.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2100 , with a minimum grade of (C).
  
  •  

    ACC 3100 - Intermediate Financial Accounting I

    (3)
    A study of financial accounting topics, including accounting valuation and reporting practices. Three major areas examined include financial accounting theory, current and noncurrent assets, and current and noncurrent liabilities.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2100  and MTH 1222  or MTH 1554  with a minimum grade of (C) in each course.
  
  •  

    ACC 3110 - Intermediate Financial Accounting II

    (3)
    A continuation of ACC 3100 . Major financial accounting areas examined include stockholders equity, dilutive securities, investments, income measurement issues, and the preparation and analysis of financial statements.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3100  with a minimum grade of (C).
  
  •  

    ACC 3180 - Accounting Information Systems: Planning and Analysis

    (3)
    This course focuses on business modeling, data analytics and the integration of accounting systems with other information systems in the organization. In doing so, it emphasizes business risk as well as information technology risk and the controls that are available over both. Students should be capable of using the analytics and modeling skills acquired in this course in order to help analyze and develop modern, technologically relevant accounting information systems. The Systems Development Life Cycle is used as the course’s logical framework, while the Unified Modeling Language set of methodologies is used to model real-world business systems using databases, decision analysis and networking.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2100  and MTH 1222  or MTH 1554 , with a minimum grade of (C) in each course.
  
  •  

    ACC 3200 - Managerial and Cost Accounting II

    (3)
    An analysis of available procedures and techniques to sharpen accounting analyses for managerial planning and control. Extends subjects introduced in ACC 2100  to non-manufacturing firms, decentralized firms, transfer pricing and segment performance measurement.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 2100  and MTH 1222  or MTH 1554 , with a minimum grade of (C) in each course.
  
  •  

    ACC 3500 - Federal Income Taxation

    (3)
    An introductory tax course that focuses on fundamental federal income taxation concepts, with primary emphasis on business entities (e.g., C corporations, pass-through entities) and secondary emphasis on individual taxation. This course generally follows the objectives of the AICPA Model Tax Curriculum.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3100  or ACC 3010  and MTH 1222  or MTH 1554 , with a minimum grade of (C)
  
  •  

    ACC 3990 - ACHIEVE III - Accounting

    (0)
    Guide students through the job search process within the Accounting major.
    Prerequisite(s): major standing and SBC 1990  and SBC 2990  
  
  •  

    ACC 4010 - Advanced Financial Accounting

    (3)
    Topics include accounting and reporting for business combinations, partnerships, consolidated entities, interim financial statements and segments of business enterprises.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3110  with a minimum grade of (C), and major standing.
  
  •  

    ACC 4110 - Auditing

    (3)
    Introduction to the objectives, techniques, and standards of internal and external audits of the accounts of an enterprise. Generally accepted auditing standards will be critically examined.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3110  and ACC 3180 , with a minimum grade of (C) in each course and major standing.
  
  •  

    ACC 4120 - Government and Not-for-Profit Accounting

    (3)
    The characteristics of not-for-profit entities are analyzed and used to define the basic concepts of accounting for funds. Accounting and reporting principles applicable to governmental units, hospitals, schools and other nonprofit entities are discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3110  with a minimum grade of (C) and major standing.
  
  •  

    ACC 4900 - Special Topics in Accounting

    (3)
    Intensive study of special topics in accounting. See schedule of classes for current offering. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 3010  or ACC 3110  with a minimum grade of (C) and major standing.
  
  •  

    ACC 4996 - Independent Study

    (1 TO 3)
    Qualified and highly motivated students may engage in individual research, directed readings or group study under the supervision of a faculty member. Offered every term. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
    Prerequisite(s): an overall GPA of (B) or better, major standing, and an approved contract prior to registration.

American Studies

  
  •  

    AMS 3000 - Topics in American Culture

    (4)
    An interdisciplinary approach to various aspects of American culture addressing both the theoretical basis for American Studies and practical application of interdisciplinary methodology. Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the knowledge application integration area.
    Prerequisite(s): Western civilization knowledge application integration area: Completion of the general education requirement in the Western civilization knowledge exploration area.
  
  •  

    AMS 4998 - Senior Project

    (4)
    Either an independent research project or an internship in American studies. Plans for this project must be developed with the concentration coordinator the semester before the student registers for this course.

Anthropology

  
  •  

    AN 1111 - Culture and Human Nature

    (4)
    Introduction to cultural and social anthropology with emphasis on the continuing human adaptation to the environment and especially the interactions among culture, society and natural environment. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area or global perspective knowledge exploration area, not both.
  
  •  

    AN 1511 - Human and Cultural Evolution

    (4)
    Introduction to physical anthropology and archaeology as applied to human and cultural evolution. Stress placed on human adaptation to environment. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area.
  
  •  

    AN 2000 - Current Issues in Anthropology

    (1 OR 4)
    Designed for the general student, this course examines issues of current interest in anthropology. Topic will be announced at the time of offering.
  
  •  

    AN 2130 - Global Human Systems

    (4)
    Introductory survey of the world-wide distribution, variation, and interconnections of cultural, economic and political systems. Basic concepts in the field of human geography and other social sciences, as relevant, are introduced as are techniques and tools used in carrying out and expressing geographic analysis. Identical with IS 2000  AND GEO 2000 . Satisfies the university general education requirement in the global perspective knowledge exploration area.
  
  •  

    AN 2140 - Applied Anthropology

    (4)
    Introduces applied anthropology through an examination of cross-cultural training in various fields, such as business, education, economic development, cultural resource management and medical anthropology. Various data collection methods and techniques as well as interpretive strategies are examined.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1111 
  
  •  

    AN 3000 - Current Problems in Anthropology

    (4)
    Seminar in which a topic or problem is studied in depth. Each seminar requires independent readings and writing. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle for up to 8 credits.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200  and instructor permission.
  
  •  

    AN 3110 - Culture, Society and Technology

    (4)
    Technology has played a critical role in all human evolution. This course provides an historical overview of the ways in which culture has shaped technology and how technology changes cultures. It emphasizes the impact of technology on modern cultures, especially technology emanating from the Western industrial revolution. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area or the Western civilization knowledge exploration area, not both.
  
  •  

    AN 3120 - Psychological Anthropology

    (4)
    Focuses on the relationship of culture and the individual; considers personality, perception, dreams, and other areas of psychological functioning in cross-cultural perspective and in relation to culture and personality theory.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1111 
  
  •  

    AN 3123 - Magic, Witchcraft and Religion

    (4)
    Anthropological theories of magic, witchcraft and religion: human interaction with beings, creatures and forces that manifest extraordinary powers; folk beliefs of non-literate people; and transformation of social systems by religious movements.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1111  
  
  •  

    AN 3127 - Racial and Ethnic Relations

    (4)
    Identical with SOC 3610 . Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the knowledge applications integration area. Prerequisite for knowledge applications integration: completion of the general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200  or AN 1111 
  
  •  

    AN 3130 - The Life Course in Anthropological Perspective

    (4)
    Socialization from infancy to old age will be considered with examples drawn from a variety of non-industrial societies as well as the literature on primates. Theories of human development across cultures will be viewed in light of this evidence. Identical with WGS 3840 .
  
  •  

    AN 3132 - Women’s Lives in Cross-Cultural Perspective

    (4)
    The lives of women in a variety of tribal and peasant societies, noting how beliefs, rituals and taboos shape the stages of the female life course and how culture influences women’s reproductive and economic roles. Identical with WGS 3815 .
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1111  or WGS 1000 
  
  •  

    AN 3133 - The Food Quest

    (4)
    Relationship of environment, subsistence activities and food-related technologies in a variety of non-industrial societies, including both of food collectors and food producers. Identical with ENV 3220 .
  
  •  

    AN 3140 - Culture and Society Through Film

    (4)
    The systematic study of selected peoples from different cultures through the ethnographic film and appropriate readings, lectures and discussions. Students learn to evaluate cultural data according to various anthropological concepts and methodologies.
  
  •  

    AN 3220 - Medical Anthropology

    (4)
    Interaction between biological, ethnopsychiatric and sociocultural environments in health, illness and treatment. Includes historical, organizational, demographic, ecological and other problems in health care delivery.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1111  or SOC 1000  or PSY 1000 
  
  •  

    AN 3221 - The Human Skeleton

    (4)
    Aspects of anatomy, physiology, variability, and health issues related to the human skeleton that may be applicable to a variety of applied social science settings. Topics include the determination of characteristics such as age and sex from skeletal remains; the evolutionary costs and benefits of skeletal changes; growth, development and aging of the skeleton; and the prevalence of bone disease in various populations.
  
  •  

    AN 3222 - Forensic Anthropology

    (4)
    Broad overview of topics relevant to forensic anthropology, an applied field of physical anthropology, including basic anatomy and physiology of the human skeleton, various methods of analyzing skeletal remains, and other approaches used by the forensic anthropologist to aid in the identification of decomposed human remains. The role of the forensic anthropologist in matters of interest to law enforcement officials and the medicolegal community.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1511  or CRJ 1100  or permission of instructor.
  
  
  •  

    AN 3240 - World Regional Geography

    (4)
    Comparative study of the world’s major geographic regions, applying data, methods and theory of geographical analysis. Students will acquire familiarity with these regions and the geographic factors that help to account for their similarities and differences Interaction between regions will also be examined. Identical with IS 3000  and GEO 3000 .
    Prerequisite(s): AN 2130  or IS 2000  or GEO 2000 
  
  •  

    AN 3250 - Peoples and Cultures of China

    (4)
    An anthropological study of China, stressing the variety of cultural and ecological adaptations characteristic of that complex society.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1111  or IS 2100 
  
  •  

    AN 3255 - Peoples and Cultures of India

    (4)
    A survey of contemporary society and culture on the Indian subcontinent, with focus on India, Pakistan and Bangladesh; emphasis on social structure, folk religion and the problems of socio-cultural change.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1111  or IS 2400 
  
  •  

    AN 3260 - Peoples and First Nations of North America

    (4)
    The cultures of certain Native Americans and Inuit (Eskimo) societies both in traditional times and in their relationship with Western society. Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1111 
  
  •  

    AN 3350 - Peoples and Cultures of Mexico and Central America

    (4)
    Anthropological studies of Indian and Mestizo societies in Mexico and Guatemala, including their separate socio-economic patterns and their integration into a dualistic social system.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1111  or IS 2500 
  
  •  

    AN 3360 - Indians of South America

    (4)
    A survey of the native South Americans. Includes warriors of the jungles, peasants and herders of the mountains, nomads of the plains and forests, and subsistence fishermen of the southern coasts.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1111  or IS 2500 
  
  •  

    AN 3381 - Anthropological Research Methods

    (4)
    Techniques of anthropological research emphasizing field research methods in cultural anthropology. May include some field work practice.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1111  or SOC 1000 
  
  •  

    AN 3410 - Museum Studies in Archaeology

    (4)
    The organization, goals and funding of archeological museums. Career preparation including hands-on practical experience in acquisitions, cataloging, preservation, display design and preparation, display evaluation, museum education and outreach programs.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1511  or AN 3581  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    AN 3430 - The Archaeology of Civilizations

    (4)
    Analysis of archaeological and written evidence to explain how civilizations developed and declined in the Old World and the New World. Examines cultural evolution from early farming and settlement to the rise and fall of complex civilizations.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1511 
  
  •  

    AN 3450 - Archaeology of North America

    (4)
    Explores the archaeological heritage of North America beginning with founding prehistoric Native American populations and continuing into historical periods.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1511 
  
  •  

    AN 3550 - Archaeology of Mesoamerica

    (4)
    The pre-Hispanic culture of Mexico and Guatemala, the Aztecs and Mayas, and their neighboring and derivative cultures. Detailed discussion of the major archaeological sites.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1511  or AN 1111 
  
  •  

    AN 3560 - Historical Archaeology

    (4)
    Study of historic cultures, lifeways, and processes of change through combined analysis of documents and material culture, such as settlement patterns, architecture, gravestones, and excavated ceramics, glass, or metal. Special attention given to intersecting cultural structures of gender, race, ethnicity, and class. Identical with WGS 3826 . Satisfies the university general education requirement in the knowledge application integration area. Prerequisite for knowledge application integration: completion of the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area. Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1511  or AN 1111  or WGS 1000  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    AN 3562 - Archaeology of Israel

    (4)
    Ancient cultures found in the ancient Near East with an emphasis on ancient Israel, the history of archaeological research in Israel and the region. Periods reviewed and case studies include the Neolithic (c. 10,000 BCE) to the early Roman Period (c. 1st century CE).
  
  •  

    AN 3563 - Archaeology, Ideology and Sacred Sites in the Ancient Near East

    (4)
    Archaeology of sacred sites in the wider Near East beginning in the Neolithic period. Anthropological models concerning the archaeology of religion as a discipline are explored. Case studies include sacred sites relevant to Judaism, Christianity and Islam with an emphasis on the history of Jerusalem.
  
  •  

    AN 3571 - Archaeological Methods and Theory

    (4)
    Introduces the field of anthropological archaeology through examination of theory, data collection methods and techniques, and interpretive strategies used to understand human histories, life-ways and cultural processes.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1511 
  
  •  

    AN 3581 - Archaeological Field School

    (4 OR 8)
    Instruction and field research including site location, excavation, artifact analysis, and conservation. May be repeated for a total of 8 credits, at least 4 of which must be at an approved U.S. archaeological field school.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    AN 3620 - Primate Behavior

    (4)
    Various bio-social factors that aid the nonhuman primates in their adaptation to the environment, implications for human behavior, classroom discussions and field studies.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1511  or AN 1111  or PSY 1000  or SOC 1000 
  
  •  

    AN 3720 - Human Adaptation

    (4)
    Examines current theory on the cultural and biological adaptation of human groups to natural and social environments. Identical with ENV 3720 .
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1511 , AN 1111 , or AN 3133 
  
  •  

    AN 3900 - Special Topics in Anthropology

    (4)
    Study of a special topic for which no regular course offerings currently exist. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle. May be used for approved course work taken during study abroad.
    Prerequisite(s): Anthropology major or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    AN 3930 - Field Experience in Anthropology

    (4)
    Field experience in anthropology with faculty supervision. An academic project related to the departmental discipline that incorporates student performance in an occupational setting. May not be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior/Senior standing; 16 credits in anthropology, of which at least 8 must be at the 3000-4000 level, and permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    AN 4320 - Social Anthropology

    (4)
    Examines social structure and social organization in anthropological perspective. Entails the study of economic, political, religious and kinship systems in the social life of man.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1111 
  
  •  

    AN 4330 - Systems of Wealth and Power in Anthropological Perspective

    (4)
    Concepts and methods of political and economic anthropology, emphasizing the interrelated state of political and economic phenomena, with particular reference to pre-industrial, non-Western societies.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1111 
  
  •  

    AN 4391 - Anthropological Theory

    (4)
    Surveys the major developments in the history of anthropological theory and traces their impact on present trends in the field. Introduces current theoretical perspectives. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1111  and junior/senior standing or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    AN 4720 - Advanced Physical Anthropology

    (4)
    The emergence and diversification of the human species in relation to the morphology and ecology of both modern and fossil man, including physical and physiological variation (sex, race and age), climatic adaptation and population genetics.
    Prerequisite(s): AN 1511 
  
  •  

    AN 4996 - Independent Study and Research

    (2 OR 4)
    A tutorial in which the student will pursue a course of reading and research with the instructor. May be repeated only once for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    AN 4997 - College Teaching Apprenticeship

    (2 OR 4)
    Supervised participation in teaching an undergraduate course in anthropology, combined with readings and discussion of teaching objectives and methods appropriate for anthropological presentation. May be taken once for credit toward a major.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

Applicable Analysis and Mathematical Modeling

  
  •  

    APM 1663 - Mathematics for Information Technology

    (4)
    Systems of linear equations, matrix algebra and linear transformations. Elementary combinatorics, recursion and induction, sets and relations. Enrollment is limited to students in the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program or with permission of the department. APM 1663 cannot be used to replace APM 2663  or MTH 2775 . Satisfies the university general education requirement in the knowledge applications integration area. Prerequisite for knowledge applications integration: Completion of the general education requirement in the formal reasoning knowledge foundation area or in the natural science and technology knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1222  with a grade of (C) or higher or MTH 1554  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    APM 2555 - Introduction to Differential Equations with Matrix Algebra

    (4)
    Introduction to ordinary differential equations, Laplace transforms, linear systems, matrices, vectors, independence, Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and applications.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1555  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    APM 2559 - Introduction to Differential Equations

    (4)
    Introduction to ordinary differential equations, solutions of exact, homogeneous, linear and separable differential equations first-order and second-order systems of differential equations, numerical methods, equilibrium solutions, stability and applications. Students cannot receive credit for both APM 2555  and APM 2559.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1555  and MTH 2775 , each with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    APM 2663 - Discrete Mathematics

    (4)
    Concepts and methods of discrete mathematics with an emphasis on their application to computer science. Logic and proofs, sets and relations, algorithms, induction and recursion, combinatorics, graphs and trees.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 1555  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    APM 3332 - Applied Matrix Theory

    (4)
    Eigenvalues, eigenvectors and their applications, matrix calculus, linear differential equations, Jordan canonical forms, and quadratic forms. Time will also be spent on various computational techniques.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 2775  with grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    APM 3430 - Theory of Computation

    (4)
    Formal models of computation, ranging from finite state automata to Turing machines. The computational models are used to discuss the languages recognized by these machines and address issues of computability. Identical with CSI 3430 .
    Prerequisite(s): APM 3610  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    APM 3557 - Elements Partial Differential Equations

    (4)
    Partial differential equations of physics, Fourier methods, Laplace transforms, orthogonal functions, initial and boundary value problems, and numerical methods.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 2554  with a grade of (C) or higher and APM 2555  with a grade of (C) or higher or APM 2559  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    APM 3610 - Design and Analysis of Algorithms

    (4)
    Computer algorithms, their design and analysis. Strategies for constructing algorithmic solutions, including divide-and-conquer dynamic programming and greedy algorithms. Development of algorithms for parallel and distributed architectures. Computational complexity as it pertains to time and space is used to evaluate the algorithms. A general overview of complexity classes is given. Identical with CSI 3610 .
    Prerequisite(s): CSI 2310  and APM 2663  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    APM 4333 - Numerical Methods

    (4)
    Propagation of errors, approximation and interpolation, numerical integration, methods for the solution of equations, Runge-Kutta and predictor-corrector methods. Offered fall of even-numbered years.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 2775  with a grade of (C) or higher, APM 2555  with a grade of (C) or higher and knowledge of a scientific programming language, or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    APM 4334 - Applied Numerical Methods: Matrix Methods

    (4)
    Systems of linear equations, Gaussian elimination, LU factorization, approximation and curve fitting, Eigenvalue problems, and nonlinear systems. Offered winter of odd-numbered years.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 2554  with a grade of (C) or higher, MTH 2775  with a grade of (C) or higher and knowledge of a scientific programming language, or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    APM 4550 - Risk Management

    (3)
    Review of interest rate theory, probability theory, and probability distributions. Development of a variety of actuarial and risk models such as contingent payment models; life contingency models; frequency, severity and aggregate claims models. Risk metrics such as standard deviation and Value at Risk (VAR) are explored. Identical with ECN 4500 . Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 3220 , ACC 3010  and STA 4227 , each with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    APM 4555 - Intermediate Ordinary Differential Equations

    (4)
    Review of elementary techniques, existence and uniqueness theory, series methods, systems of equations, oscillation and comparison theorems, Sturm-Liouville theory, stability theory and applications.
    Prerequisite(s): APM 2555  with a grade of (C) or higher and MTH 4552  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    APM 4663 - Graph Theory and Combinatorial Mathematics

    (4)
    Introduction to combinatorics. Topics include techniques of enumeration, fundamental concepts of graph theory, applications to transport networks, matching theory and block design. Offered every fall.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 2775  with a grade of (C) or higher and APM 2663  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    APM 4777 - Computer Algebra

    (4)
    The mathematics and algorithms for symbolic computation. Includes theory of algebraic extensions, modular and p-adic methods, Groebner bases, factorization and zeros of polynomials, solutions to systems of polynomial equations, applications to automatic geometric theorem proving and closed form solutions to differential equations.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 2775  with a grade of (C) or higher and knowledge of a scientific computer programming language, or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    APM 4905 - Special Topics

    (2 OR 4)
    Advanced study of a selected topic in applied mathematics. May be repeated for additional credit.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    APM 4996 - Independent Study

    (2 OR 4)
    Reading or research on some topic in applied mathematics. May be repeated for additional credit.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of department.

Applied Health Sciences

  
  •  

    AHS 3310 - Health Care Safety

    (4)
    Reviews common safety practices to be used throughout the health care arena (covering both employee and patient safety) including incident reporting, infection control, lifting techniques, error prevention, reporting systems, workforce issues, accountability, laws and regulations and the promotion and implementation of safety programs and practices.
    Prerequisite(s): HS 2000  and HS 3000 
  
  •  

    AHS 3320 - Delivering Safe Patient Care

    (4)
    Discusses the core principles and best practices of patient safety in both hospital and ambulatory care settings by focusing on error prevention, reporting systems and information technology, workforce issues, training issues, accountability and various laws and regulations.
    Prerequisite(s): HS 2000  and HS 3000 
  
  •  

    AHS 3340 - Hospital Safety and Health

    (4)
    Concentrates on the principles and practices of safety in the hospital setting by focusing on exposures including tuberculosis, needle-sticks, anesthesia gases, latex allergies, radiation, medical waste, and the controls necessary to prevent injury both to the health care employee and the patient.
    Prerequisite(s): HS 2000  and HS 3000 
  
  •  

    AHS 4310 - Ergonomics in the Health Care Industry

    (3)
    This course equips healthcare workers with knowledge and skills to recognize and reduce ergonomic risks that may lead to a musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) in their workplace and to enhance their understanding of and communication with patients that may be receiving treatment for MSDs at their facility.
    Prerequisite(s): HS 2000  and HS 3000  and BIO 2100  and BIO 2600 
  
  •  

    AHS 4320 - Risk Reduction Safety Culture Improvement in Healthcare

    (2)
    This course explores the factors critical for a positive workplace safety culture including supporting behaviors of site leadership personnel and safety behaviors of employees. Students will apply contemporary problem solving strategies to reduce risks for blood borne pathogens, slips and falls, patient handling, and other injuries and illnesses of healthcare workers.
    Prerequisite(s): HS 2000  and HS 3000 

Applied Language Studies

  
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    ALS 1101 - The Humanity of Language

    (4)
    An introduction to the interrelationships of language and other cultural subsystems. Linguistic knowledge, the child’s acquisition of language, sound and writing systems, meaning and communication, language and social groups are among the topics discussed. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
  
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    ALS 1102 - Vocabulary Etymology

    (4)
    A basic course in vocabulary building. The origin of scientific and literary terms, foreign phrases in current use, borrowing of words into English from other languages, and the relationship between meaning and culture and meaning and context. Course not applicable to LIN programs.
  
  •  

    ALS 4317 - Models of Second Language Acquisition

    (4)
    Development of second language ability among children and adults. Topics will include first language acquisition theory, the relationship of second language acquisition to linguistic theory, and will review and evaluate competing models of second language development.
  
  •  

    ALS 4320 - Linguistics and Reading

    (4)
    Linguistic description and analysis of the process of getting meaning from print. The course will review competing linguistic models of the reading process and insights from first and second language acquisition, psycholinguistics, reading disorders and studies in writing.
  
  •  

    ALS 4334 - Language Development in Children

    (4)
    Language acquisition in normal and abnormal children: stages of the acquisition process, the role of the environment, the relationship between language and the development of other skills, and language acquisition in children with sensory or psychological disorders.
  
  •  

    ALS 4335 - Psycholinguistics

    (4)
    The psychology of language, the accommodation between the cognitive and physical structure of humans and the structure of language, the nature of the language learning process, and the consequences of language use. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisites for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
  
  •  

    ALS 4340 - The Biology of Language

    (4)
    Animal communication and the evolution of man’s capacity for language, development of language in normal and abnormal children, disorders of speech, hearing and language, language and the brain, and genetic aspects of language.
  
  •  

    ALS 4360 - Neurolinguistics

    (4)
    The neurology of language: essentials of neuroanatomy, neurological mechanisms underlying language, aphasia and kindred disorders of speech; the relationship of language to memory, intelligence and cognition; and language and mental retardation and psychological disorders.
  
  •  

    ALS 4374 - Cross-Cultural Communication

    (4)
    A theoretical and practical examination of the role of language and nonverbal modes in intercultural communication. Problems and strategies for developing awareness of and operational skills in intercultural processes. Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S diversity.
  
  •  

    ALS 4375 - Language and Culture

    (4)
    Language viewed as cultural behavior: its system, acquisition and use; its relation to history, attitudes and behavior; and standard languages, social dialects, pidgins and creoles.
  
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    ALS 4376 - Language and Society

    (4)
    Language in its social context, intrasocietal variation, social evaluation of language varieties (style, dialect) as an influence in language change, and the choice of a language variety as an index of group solidarity, social ideology and individual attitudes.
  
  •  

    ALS 4418 - Teaching English as a Second Language

    (4)
    Approaches, methods and techniques of teaching pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary. The use of language tests and laboratory techniques.
    Prerequisite(s): LIN 2201 
  
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    ALS 4438 - Theory/Practice in Language Testing

    (4)
    A study of the different types of aptitude and achievement tests used in different language settings, including research and educational situations. Brief introduction to test statistics and computerized analysis of test scores. Practical aspects of testing: design, scoring and administration.
    Prerequisite(s): ALS 4317  or ALS 4418  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    ALS 4890 - Topics in Applied Language Science

    (4)
    Specific topics and issues in the study of language in its cultural, social or historical contexts. May be repeated for additional credit under different subtitle.
  
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    ALS 4960 - Practicum

    (4)
    Internship in an assigned ESL program under the guidance of a university instructor. Offered fall, winter and summer. Availability in summer is limited. For eligibility requirement, see Practicum Eligibility. May be taken for up to 8 credits.
    Prerequisite(s): ALS 4418  and permission of instructor.

Applied Music - Individual Lesson

  
  •  

    MUA 1000 - Voice

    (1 TO 2)
    Admission to music program through audition.
  
  •  

    MUA 1002 - Piano

    (1 OR 2)
    Piano lessons
  
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    MUA 1004 - Organ

    (1 OR 2)
    Organ lessons
 

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