May 28, 2022  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 The department offers selected courses from this catalog as warranted by student needs and availability of faculty. Specific offerings for each term may be found in the Schedule of Classes.

Course Renumbering Project

Effective the Fall 2017 semester, all undergraduate and graduate courses at Oakland University were renumbered from 3 digits to 4 digits.

Most subject codes will remain the same, but the new four-digit course numbers may in some cases be similar to the previous three-digit course numbers and in other cases be different because academic departments have resequenced their course numbers.

Follow this link to the conversion list.

This searchable PDF is a guide to see how the course numbers have changed. Each row represents a course, and the columns represent: the subject code, the previous three-digit course number,and the new four-digit course number for that course, beginning in Fall 2017.

To search this PDF for a specific course using the old number, you can just hit “Control” (or “Command” if on Mac) and “F,” then type in a specific course (e.g. “WRT 160”) to find the new course number .

The following subject codes have changed:

  • Studio Art (SA) changed to (ART)
  • Some English (ENG) courses changed to Creative Writing (CW)
  • Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) and Computer and Information Technology (CIT) changed to Computer Science and Informatics (CSI)
  • Music Theory and Composition (MUT) changed to either Applied Music (MUA) or Musicology and Music Education (MUS)
  • (MLS) changed to (CDS)
  • Some (JRN) courses changed to (PR)

For more information, please contact your academic adviser. Graduate students, please contact your academic department for advising.

NOTE: If you enrolled or transferred after fall 2014 please be sure to search the 2017-18 catalog courses and review the 3 to 4 digit conversions list.

 

Cinema

  
  •  

    CIN 1150 - Introduction to Film

    (4)
    Introduction to the art of film by examination of the filmmaking process, study of narrative and non-narrative film, and exploration of film’s relation to society. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the arts knowledge exploration area. Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity.
  
  •  

    CIN 1600 - Introduction to Filmmaking

    (4)
    Introduction to digital film production through group projects.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100  cinema studies major or minor standing.
  
  •  

    CIN 2100 - Film and Formal Analysis

    (4)
    Exploration of the dramatic and narrative content of classic and modern films, treating such elements as theme, motif, symbol, imagery, structure and characterization, as well as cultural and philosophical implications. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the literature knowledge exploration area.
  
  •  

    CIN 2150 - Methods of Cinema Studies

    (4)
    Introduction to the academic study of film, with special emphasis on scholarly research and formal writing. Film screening lab may be required. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100 ; WRT 1060  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    CIN 2320 - Masterpieces of World Cinema

    (4)
    Examination of a range of cinematic traditions, historical trends, and national film movements from around the globe. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the global perspective knowledge exploration area.
  
  •  

    CIN 2600 - Form and Meaning in Filmmaking

    (4)
    Through group projects and individual editing, students explore formal methods of creating meaning in shots, sequences and short films.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1600 
  
  •  

    CIN 3150 - Film Theory and Criticism

    (4)
    Survey of major critical approaches to the academic study of film, such as those theoretical models proposed by Eisenstein, Kracauer, Arnheim, Bazin, Sarris and Metz. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 2150  
  
  •  

    CIN 3200 - History of Film: The Silent Era

    (4)
    Survey of directors and films important in shaping film history: Griffith, Eisenstein, Chaplin, Mumau, Pabst, Lang and others. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100 
  
  •  

    CIN 3210 - History of Film: The Sound Era to 1958

    (4)
    Examination of significant directors, genres and movements: Welles, Hitchcock, Renoir, DeSica and others; the western, gangster film, musical, neorealism, film noir. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100 
  
  •  

    CIN 3220 - History of Film: The New Wave and Beyond

    (4)
    Study of film since 1959, including directors such as Godard, Truffaut, Akerman, Fassbinder, Herzog, Wertmuller, Bergman, Altman, Kubrick and Scorsese. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100 
  
  •  

    CIN 3230 - History of Film: Into the 21st Century

    (4)
    Study of developments in film since the late 1980s, including topics such as Hollywood cinema, independent film-making, experimental films, feminist cinema, national cinema, and new technologies such as digital imaging. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100 
  
  •  

    CIN 3300 - Studies in Documentary Film

    (4)
    Examination of the history of documentary film-making. Additional focus on aesthetic and industrial practices. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100 
  
  •  

    CIN 3305 - Adaptation: Fiction, Drama, Film

    (4)
    Examination of how works of fiction and drama are transformed into film, including focus on creative and industrial practice. Identical with ENG 3675 . Satisfies the university general education requirement in knowledge applications integration area. Prerequisite for knowledge applications integration: completion of the general education requirement in the literature knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): WRT 1060  or equivalent with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    CIN 3310 - Experimental and Avant-Garde Film

    (4)
    Historical examination of those forms of motion picture expression that fall outside of mainstream commercial filmmaking. Additional focus on aesthetic and artisanal practices. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100 
  
  •  

    CIN 3320 - National Cinemas and Film Cultures

    (4)
    Film movements and cinema cultures from outside of the United States. National contexts vary and may be repeated under different subtitle for credit. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    CIN 3330 - Understanding Media Industries

    (4)
    Examination of local, regional, national and global film and media industry practices and communities, with emphasis upon the emergence and impact of key trends in these fields. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100  
  
  •  

    CIN 3610 - Documentary Filmmaking

    (4)
    Introduction to documentary film pre-production, production, and post-production. Additional emphasis upon how documentary film aesthetics shape audience experience.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 2600 
  
  •  

    CIN 3620 - Narrative Filmmaking

    (4)
    Different forms and conventions of narrative filmmaking. Relevant aesthetic concepts and technical skills will be put into practice through the production of original short-form narrative films.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 2600 
  
  •  

    CIN 3630 - Experimental Filmmaking

    (4)
    Range of experimental filmmaking techniques, with a focus on aesthetic practices that fall outside of mainstream commercial filmmaking.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1600  (C)
  
  •  

    CIN 3650 - Essay Filmmaking

    (4)
    Study of different forms of the essay film, a genre that investigates ideas and challenges ways of thinking, and production of original essay films.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1600  (C) and CIN 2150  (C)
  
  •  

    CIN 3660 - Short Form Filmmaking

    (4)
    Through critical analysis, development of an understanding of single and multi-camera short form, non-theatrical film production and creation of original projects.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 2600  (C)
  
  •  

    CIN 3900 - Topics in Film History, Industry, and Technology

    (4)
    Close examination of one or more of the major artistic, industrial or cultural trends shaping film history. Topics explored may include film censorship, art cinemas, the history of cinema technology, historiography. May be repeated under different subtitle for credit. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100  
  
  •  

    CIN 3901 - Topics in Film Genres

    (4)
    Focus on the formation, function and analysis of film genres, with emphasis on individual types, such as the western, horror, romantic comedy, melodrama, or others. Topics to be selected by instructor. May be repeated under different subtitle for credit. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100 
  
  •  

    CIN 3902 - Topics in Film Authors, Authorship, and Aesthetics

    (4)
    Examination of historical and aesthetic issues related to the creation of motion pictures. May focus on individual film directors or other individuals, groups, and institutions involved in the filmmaking process. Topics to be selected by instructor. May be repeated under different subtitle for credit. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100 
  
  •  

    CIN 3905 - Topics in Film

    (4)
    Examination of specialized subjects in film. May be repeated for credit under separate sub-headings. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100 
  
  •  

    CIN 3906 - Topics in Filmmaking

    (4)
    Examination of specialized subjects in film production, such as post-production and visual effects, cinematography, sound design, and film titles and credit sequences. Topics to be selected by instructor. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 2600 
  
  •  

    CIN 4900 - Advanced Topics in Film

    (4)
    Specialized topics in film history, theory and research methods. Film screening lab may be required. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 3150  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    CIN 4901 - Advanced Topics in Film Theory

    (4)
    Close examination of one or more theoretical approaches used to analyze film texts. May be repeated under different subtitle for additional credit. Film screening lab may be required. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100 ; CIN 2150 ; CIN 3150 ; permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    CIN 4930 - Field Internship in Cinema Studies

    (1 TO 4)
    Field internship for cinema studies majors under faculty supervision. Academic project that incorporates student performance in an occupational setting. May be repeated for up to 4 credits.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 1150  or CIN 2100 ; junior/senior standing; 16 credits in cinema studies courses, with 8 at the 3000-4000 level; and instructor permission.
  
  •  

    CIN 4996 - Independent Study

    (1 TO 4)
    Study on an independent basis for students with demonstrated interest in film. A proposed course of study must be submitted to the prospective instructor in the semester before the independent study is to be taken.
    Prerequisite(s): one course in film.
  
  •  

    CIN 4999 - Filmmaking Thesis

    (4)
    Directed individual work completing a major thesis film and research into film industry practices. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing, CIN 2150 , and 28 credits in cinema studies of which at least 12 must be at the 3000 level, or permission of instructor.

Clinical and Diagnostic Sciences

  
  •  

    CDS 2010 - Careers in Biomedical Diagnostic and Therapeutic Sciences

    (1)
    An introductory seminar in biomedical diagnostic and therapeutic sciences, including career opportunities in clinical settings (medical laboratory science, histotechnology, nuclear medicine technology, radiologic technology, physician assistant, and medical doctor), industrial sales and/or research and development, basic medical research and education. Offered fall semester.
  
  •  

    CDS 2050 - Contemporary Issues in Health Care Organizations and Practice

    (2)
    An understanding of laboratory and health care organizations and issues to prepare students as professional practitioners to function effectively in a rapidly changing environment. Offered fall and summer semesters.
  
  •  

    CDS 2100 - Medical Terminology

    (1)
    This course is designed as an independent study using a programmed text. Initial emphasis is on learning Greek and Latin word parts and rules for combining them, with cumulative study directed to the analysis and definition of medical terms. Offered fall, winter, and summer semesters.
  
  •  

    CDS 2260 - Introduction to Laboratory Theory and Techniques

    (2)
    Basic concepts and principles in the practice of clinical laboratory science. Integration of principles of phlebotomy, microscopy, laboratory mathematics, spectrophotometry, and laboratory safety. Offered fall, winter semesters.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 1440  and CHM 1470  
  
  •  

    CDS 3120 - Hematology/Cellular Pathophysiology

    (3)
    Topics include current concepts of hematopoiesis, including selected topics in red blood cell, white blood cell and platelet morphogenesis, physiology and pathophysiology; an introduction to the basic principles involved in cellular disease mechanisms. Offered fall semester.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2600  with a (C) or instructor permission.
  
  •  

    CDS 3140 - Hemostasis

    (3)
    In depth study of the basic physiology and pathophysiology of the human hemostatic system, including the role of the vasculature, platelets and plasma proteins. Laboratory included. Offered fall semester.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2600  with a (C) and CDS 2260  with a (B-) and permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    CDS 3350 - Clinical Parasitology/Mycology/Virology

    (3)
    Introduction to clinical parasitology, mycology and virology. Included are: morphology, life cycles, reproduction, classification and diseases in humans. Offered winter semester.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1200  and CDS 2260 
  
  •  

    CDS 3360 - Clinical Parasitology/Mycology/Virology Laboratory

    (1)
    Laboratory to accompany CDS 3350 . Includes basic parasitology and mycology isolation and identification procedures such as staining, and macroscopic and microscopic observations. Also includes very basic rapid virology diagnostic techniques. Offered winter semester.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1200  and CDS 2260 
    Corequisite(s): CDS 3350  
  
  •  

    CDS 4000 - Medical Genetics

    (4)
    The course will discuss the molecular nature and inheritance patterns of genes. Classical genetics and the cause and diagnosis of disease at the molecular level will be detailed. Offered fall semester.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2600  with a (C)
  
  •  

    CDS 4010 - Human Pathology

    (4)
    Basic principles of human pathology appropriate for students pursuing curricula in the health-related disciplines. Diseases of the major systems of the body are studied. Credit will not be granted for both CDS 4010 and CDS 5000. Cross-listed with CDS 5000.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1200 , BIO 2100 , and (BIO 2600  or BIO 3620 ) with grade of D (1.0) or better.
  
  •  

    CDS 4020 - Molecular Diagnostics

    (3)
    Discussion of diagnosis of disease on a molecular level including current molecular diagnostic techniques and procedures, and correlation with clinical conditions. Laboratory included. Offered winter semester.
    Prerequisite(s): CDS 2260  with a (B-) and CDS 4000  with a (C)
  
  •  

    CDS 4160 - Medical Hematology

    (4)
    Theory and techniques in hematology, including red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet morphogenesis, physiology, and pathophysiology. Offered winter semester.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2600  with a (C)
    Corequisite(s): CDS 4170 
  
  •  

    CDS 4170 - Hematology Laboratory

    (1)
    To accompany CDS 4160 . Offered winter semester.
    Prerequisite(s): CDS 2260  with a (B-)
    Corequisite(s): CDS 4160 
  
  •  

    CDS 4230 - Medical Immunology

    (3)
    An introduction to the principles and practices of immunology with emphasis on cellular and molecular interactions, using an experimental approach. This course will include the normal immune responses and clinical conditions, including autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, hypersensitivity disorders and transplant rejection. Offered winter and spring semester.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2600  with a (C)
  
  •  

    CDS 4240 - Immunohematology

    (3)
    Discussion of the immunologic and genetic basis for the study of red cell antigen/antibody systems, including physiologic and pathophysiologic consequences of foreign antigen exposure. Offered fall semester.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2600  with a (C), CDS 2260  with a (B-), and CDS 4230  with a (C) or instructor permission.
    Corequisite(s): CDS 4241  
  
  •  

    CDS 4241 - Immunohematology Laboratory

    (1)
    Laboratory designed to familiarize the student with basic skills utilized in the immunohematology laboratory. Emphasis is placed upon knowledge of laboratory principles, development of laboratory skills, interpretation of results, organizational techniques, accuracy of laboratory testing, and development of problem solving skills. Offered fall semester.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2600  with a (C), CDS 2260  with a (B-), and CDS 4230  with a (C) or instructor permission.
    Corequisite(s): CDS 4240  
  
  •  

    CDS 4250 - Medical Biochemistry

    (4)
    An integrated approach to human biochemistry stressing metabolic interrelationships. Topics covered include: structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids; enzyme mechanisms and regulation; metabolic pathways and control; nucleic acid structure, function and processing; regulation of gene expression; intracellular and extracellular signal transduction. Offered fall and summer semesters.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2600  or CHM 1450  and CHM 1480  
  
  •  

    CDS 4270 - Clinical Chemistry

    (4)
    A theoretical introduction to the fundamentals of clinical chemistry, with emphasis on pathophysiology and clinical correlations. To include an introduction to theoretical and practical aspects of relevant instrumentation and methods of clinical analysis. Offered fall semester.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 2600  with a (C), and CDS 4250  with a (C) or instructor permission.
  
  •  

    CDS 4280 - Clinical Chemistry Laboratory

    (1)
    Provides practical experience in the application of clinical instrumentation and current clinical methodologies to the performance of clinical chemistry assays. Offered fall semester.
    Prerequisite(s): CDS 2260  with a (B-)
    Corequisite(s): CDS 4270 
  
  •  

    CDS 4300 - Clinical Microbiology

    (4)
    Provides a background in basic medical microbiology, including the morphology, cultivation, identification and control of microorganisms. Offered summer and fall semesters.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 1200 
  
  •  

    CDS 4310 - Clinical Microbiology Laboratory

    (1)
    Laboratory to accompany CDS 4300 . Includes basic microbiological procedures such as aseptic technique, isolation, cultivating, biochemical characteristics and staining of selected microbes, with regard to their importance in the diagnosis of human diseases. Offered summer and fall semesters.
    Prerequisite(s): CDS 2260 
    Corequisite(s): CDS 4300 
  
  •  

    CDS 4320 - Medical Microbiology Laboratory

    (1)
    Laboratory for non-CLS majors to accompany CDS 4300 . Includes basic microbiological procedures such as aseptic technique, isolation, cultivation, biochemical characteristics, and staining of selected microbes, with regard to their importance in human diseases. Offered summer and fall semesters.
    Corequisite(s): CDS 4300 
  
  •  

    CDS 4400 - Clinical Correlations

    (3)
    A problem-solving, multidisciplinary, case-study-based course which integrates material from the various clinical laboratory science disciplines. The course utilizes critical-thinking exercises to interpret data across disciplines, correlating results to disease problem-solving and quality assurances. Offered winter semester.
    Prerequisite(s): CDS 4240 , CDS 3140 , CDS 4270 , CDS 4160 , and CDS 4300 
  
  •  

    CDS 4900 - Special Topics

    (1 TO 4)
    May be repeated for additional credit.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    CDS 4929 - Directed Readings

    (1 TO 4)
    Student initiated and problem-oriented directed study focusing on medical laboratory science issues. May be repeated for additional credit.
    Prerequisite(s): program permission.
  
  •  

    CDS 4995 - Directed Research

    (2 TO 4)
    May be repeated for additional credit.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    CDS 4997 - Apprentice College Teaching

    (1 TO 3)
    Directed teaching of selected undergraduate courses. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. Graded S/U.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

Communication

  
  •  

    COM 1000 - Introduction to Communication Studies

    (4)
    Examines the centrality of communication to human experience including key concepts essential to understanding the processes and practices of communication, the theoretical models and traditions of the discipline, and the historical development of the field.
  
  •  

    COM 1100 - Collegiate Communication

    (1)
    A twelve week, one credit course with a primary goal of teaching students how successful communication and relationship development can improve their chances of academic and personal success.
  
  •  

    COM 1500 - Introduction to American Sign Language

    (4)
    Conversational American Sign Language. Introduction to basic sign vocabulary and grammatical features including facial expression and body language. Includes an examination of the psychological, cultural and linguistic aspects of the deaf community.
  
  •  

    COM 1501 - American Sign Language

    (4)
    A continuation of COM 1500 
    Prerequisite(s): COM 1500 
  
  •  

    COM 2000 - Public Speaking

    (4)
    Theory and practice in public address: adaptations required by particular goals, audience and occasions, and classroom interactions.
  
  •  

    COM 2001 - Professional Communication

    (4)
    Explores the theories, and practices associated with professional communication. Students will focus on issues common in professional contexts including oral presentation, interviews, and interpersonal skills in the workplace including working collaboratively with others and increasing responsiveness to organization diversity.
  
  •  

    COM 2200 - Rhetoric and Public Culture

    (4)
    The role of rhetoric in creating, negotiating, and reconceptualizing U.S. democratic values, practices, and institutions and the historical development of public culture and the rhetorical interventions that have shaped it. Examines rhetoric as a transformational modality capable of managing disagreement, motivating civil discourse, and promoting peaceful socio-political change.
  
  •  

    COM 2201 - Argumentation and Debate

    (4)
    Theories of argumentation from the classical to the contemporary period combined with debating experience. Propositions of fact, value and policy are distinguished and related to the construction and selection of argument. Debate experience will focus on the national intercollegiate proposition.
  
  •  

    COM 2202 - Persuasion and Social Change

    (4)
    Examination of the communicative processes by which movements for social change influence institutions and actors. Emphasis on persuasive strategies for mobilization, maintenance and social transformation including narrative and argument, symbolism and music, and the role of leadership. Analysis of case studies and consideration of contemporary efforts at social change.
  
  •  

    COM 2403 - Group Dynamics and Communication

    (4)
    Group dynamics, discussion and problem solving; influences of group structure, norms, roles, leadership and climate on the processes of group communication and collaborative decision making.
  
  •  

    COM 2500 - American Sign Language III

    (4)
    Continues the work of COM 1500  or COM 1501  with a focus on clarity and completion of expressions. Accurate reception as well as an examination of literary prose in a deaf community.
    Prerequisite(s): COM 1501  
  
  •  

    COM 2501 - American Sign Language IV

    (4)
    Develops expressive and receptive fluency through a study of the performance and structure of American sign language poetry.
    Prerequisite(s): COM 2500  
  
  •  

    COM 2600 - Media and Social Identity

    (4)
    Explores the role of media in the construction of international, national and local communities, as well as social identity. Students will be given an historical overview of the development of media with an emphasis on the role of media in shaping our ideas of ethnicity, gender identity and citizenship. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area.
  
  •  

    COM 2650 - Introduction to Media Communication

    (4)
    Introduction to the historical, programming, physical, legal, social, and economic aspects of broadcasting and its transformation in a digital age.
  
  •  

    COM 2654 - Audio Production

    (4)
    Analysis and evaluation of contemporary audio/radio production and programming introduction to writing, producing, and performing audio programming. Identical with JRN 2654 .
  
  •  

    COM 2655 - Introduction to Live TV Production

    (4)
    Basics of production and recording video in a live television studio as well as basics of camera operation and the roles of professionals on the floor and the control room.
  
  •  

    COM 2656 - Introduction to Digital Media Production

    (4)
    Editing video content for digital media. Shooting and production of video content for social media and traditional broadcasting formats using both HD cameras and cellphones. Non-Linear video editing techniques.
  
  •  

    COM 2702 - Performance Communication

    (4)
    Foundations, history, and theory of performance communication. Particular attention given to how cultural processes and practices influence performance.
  
  •  

    COM 3000 - Relational Communication Theory

    (4)
    Survey of major theoretical approaches to the study of relational communication. Includes overview of history, paradigmatic assumptions, and current research. Examines individually-centered theories, discourse and interaction processes, and interpersonal theories.
    Prerequisite(s): COM 1000  or permission of instructor, sophomore standing.
  
  •  

    COM 3002 - Cultural Theory in Communication

    (4)
    Theoretical underpinnings of cultural studies, situated within communication studies. Embodied performance, discourse, and message construction will as the primary grounds of theorizing. Application of theories to socio-cultural issues and communicative processes.
    Prerequisite(s): COM 1000  with a grade of (C) or higher or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    COM 3003 - Media and Mass Communication Theory

    (4)
    Major theoretical approaches to the study of media and mass communication. Includes overview of history, paradigmatic assumptions and current research. Examines sub-disciplines and related essential distinctions between humanistic and social scientific approaches.
    Prerequisite(s): COM 1000  with a grade of (C) or higher or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    COM 3080 - Competitive Speaking

    (2)
    Advanced practice and application of speech writing, public address and oral interpretation skills using many of the standards established by the National Forensics Association. May be repeated for up to 6 credits.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    COM 3200 - Persuasion

    (4)
    Analysis of persuasion in current society, psychological bases of persuasion, ethical considerations, and distinctions between debate and persuasive argument.
  
  •  

    COM 3201 - Rhetorical Theory

    (4)
    Examination of major theories of rhetoric from classical to contemporary times.
    Prerequisite(s): COM 1000  with a grade of (C) or higher or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    COM 3300 - Multicultural Communication

    (4)
    Relationships among culture, communication and perception, and how these relationships are manifested in our daily interactions among people who are racially, ethnically and sexually different from us. Students learn communication practices necessary to create understanding in intercultural encounters. Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both.
    Prerequisite(s): junior standing. Completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
  
  •  

    COM 3301 - Race and Communication

    (4)
    Examines the ways communication practices shape and are shaped by racialized identities. Explores identity formation through domains of interpersonal communication, institutional discourse, political rhetorics, cultural performances, educational pedagogies, and religious perspectives.
  
  •  

    COM 3400 - Relational Communication

    (4)
    Examination of the roles of communication, identity, and sexuality in the development, maintenance, and deterioration of relational attachments.
  
  •  

    COM 3401 - Communication in Organizations

    (4)
    Communication theory and practice within organizational systems.
  
  •  

    COM 3402 - Communication in Leadership

    (4)
    Examines the communication qualities of leadership in various contexts including decision-making teams, groups and organizations. Consideration of major theoretical approaches to leadership and applied skills and practices.
  
  •  

    COM 3403 - Interpersonal Conflict

    (4)
    Examines the role of conflict in interpersonal interaction. Emphasis is on the factors which contribute to the negotiation of conflict.
  
  •  

    COM 3404 - Nonverbal Communication

    (4)
    Analyzes the effects of nonverbal communication on human interaction in the interpersonal setting.
  
  •  

    COM 3405 - Gender Communication

    (4)
    Explores the relationships between gender and communication strategies and settings. The course examines how gender is experienced and how individuals learn to manage the dynamic of gender in interpersonal interaction and public discourse.
  
  •  

    COM 3406 - Listening in Communication

    (2)
    Examination of the differences between hearing and listening in responsible communication. Identifies barriers to effective listening and explores ways to manage them. Different listening skills appropriate for diverse types and purposes of listening are identified and examined.
  
  •  

    COM 3601 - Communication, Mobile Media, and the Internet

    (4)
    Examines the relationship between communication practices and the networked technologies of the Internet and mobile media, including their impact on politics, commerce, knowledge, privacy, and interpersonal relationships. Focus on the popular practices of search engines, video sharing services, texting, and social media sites.
  
  •  

    COM 3602 - Television Studies in the Digital Age

    (4)
    Examination of the relationships between media technologies, institutions, cultural forms and audiences within contemporary convergence culture. The focus is on how traditional forms of mass media texts, particularly television, have been impacted by new technologies and how such shifts reconfigure our understanding of media audiences/consumers.
  
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    COM 3603 - Critical Approaches to Popular Music

    (4)
    Draws on core concepts from media and cultural studies to understand and analyze popular music’s relationship to social and culture production. Key debates discussed include cities, technologies, gender and sexuality.
  
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    COM 3606 - Media, Gender and Sexuality

    (4)
    Examines the relationship between media and cultural ideas about gender and sexuality. Emphasis on the ways that media institutions, texts, and audiences construct, negotiate, and interpret changing concepts about masculinity, femininity, and sexual preference. Identical with WGS 3827 .
  
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    COM 3607 - Rise of Electronic Media

    (4)
    Examines the development of the technologies, institutions, regulations, cultural forms, and audiences of electronic media. Considers the ways in which media was both shaped by and was a force in changing cultural and social conditions. Satisfies the university general education requirement in Western civilization knowledge exploration area.
  
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    COM 3650 - Advanced Audio Production

    (4)
    Advanced skills in studio and remote audio production, editing, and programming. Identical with JRN 3840 .
    Prerequisite(s): COM 2654  
  
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    COM 3900 - Special Topics in Communication

    (4)
    Various topics in communication theory and practice chosen by department faculty. May be repeated for additional credit under different subtitles.
  
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    COM 4200 - Rhetorical Criticism in Communication

    (4)
    Examines research methods used in rhetorical criticism from traditional to contemporary approaches. Provides principles for the analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of persuasive discourse. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): COM 1000  with a grade of (C) or higher or permission of instructor.
  
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    COM 4201 - Discourse Theory

    (4)
    Theories of discourse including critical discourse analysis and discursive psychology. Methods of discourse analysis in communication. Relation of discourse to communication.
 

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