May 21, 2024  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 The department offers selected courses from this catalog as warranted by student needs and availability of faculty. Specific offerings for each term may be found in the Schedule of Classes.
 

 

Entrepreneurship

  
  • ENT 440 - New Venture Creation

    (4)
    Explores the process for creating new ventures, including ideation, evaluation of business opportunities, business planning, financial planning, financial analysis, and assembling business resources. Students will focus on integrating all aspects of a start-up while recognizing the external environment. Other concepts include competitive analysis, competitive positioning, market segmentation, and issues related to launching new ventures. ENT 301 and MKT 460 recommended.
    Prerequisite(s): Non-business students: ENT 201, ENT 202 with a minimum grade of 2.0. Business students: QMM 240, ECN 202, ACC 210, MIS 100, FIN 322, MKT 302 with a minimum grade of 2.0.
  
  • ENT 480 - Seminar in Entrepreneurship

    (4)
    Study of selected topic or current issue relevant to the practice of entrepreneurship. Topics may include Social Entrepreneurship, Family Businesses, High Tech Entrepreneurial Ventures or any area not covered by a specific course. May be repeated for a total of 8 credits. ENT 301 is recommended.
    Prerequisite(s): Non-business students: ENT 201, ENT 202 with a minimum grade of 2.0. Business students: QMM 240, ECN 202, ACC 210, MIS 100, FIN 322, MKT 302 with a minimum grade of 2.0.

Environmental Sciences

  
  • ENV 308 - Introduction to Environmental Studies

    (4)
    Survey of a broad range of environmental issues from a scientific viewpoint. Basic ecological and thermodynamic principles with applications to air, water and land pollution; human demography and food supplies; alternative futures. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the natural science and technology knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing.
  
  • ENV 309 - Principles of Geology

    (3)
    Basic concepts of geology including rocks and minerals; weathering processes and products; hydrogeology and surface hydrology; erosion, sedimentation, and transport; oil, gas, ore, and mineral formation, exploration, and exploitation; and environmental issues.
  
  • ENV 310 - Economics of the Environment

    (3)
    Identical with ECN 310.
    Prerequisite(s): ECN 150 or 201 or 210.
  
  • ENV 312 - Energy and the Environment

    (4)
    Basic facts of energy: sources, forms, the roles it plays, and its ultimate fate. Includes study of laws limiting energy utilization, energy flow patterns, effects of energy use on the environment and analyses of current energy-related problems.
    Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing; mathematics proficiency at the MTH 061 level.
  
  • ENV 322 - The Food Quest

    (4)
    Identical with AN 322.
  
  • ENV 350 - Selected Topics

    (1 to 4)
    Technical studies in special areas; topics vary with semester. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): junior standing and permission of instructor.
  
  • ENV 352 - Geographic Information System Analysis for Sustainability

    (4)
    Identical with PS 352.
  
  • ENV 354 - Global Environmental Governance

    (4)
    Identical with PS 354. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the knowledge application integration area. Prerequisite for knowledge applications integration: completion of the general education requirement in the social science knowledge explanation area. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing area: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
  
  • ENV 355 - Public and Environmental Health

    (3)
    Emphasizing a public health perspective, this course surveys human health issues along with control strategies to reduce risk. Topics include: epidemiology, disease vectors, drinking water, occupational health, food protection, solid and hazardous wastes.
    Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing.
  
  • ENV 364 - Hazardous Materials Emergency Response

    (3)
    Review of standard operating procedures when dealing with responses to hazardous materials incidents. Planning procedures, policies and application of procedures for incident levels, personal protective equipment, decontamination, safety, communications and governmental reporting are stressed.
    Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing.
  
  • ENV 368 - Fundamentals of Hazardous Materials Regulations

    (3)
    An introduction to the regulations governing the manufacture, use, storage, transportation, treatment and disposal of hazardous materials. Related management issues of liability, compliance, ethics, assessment, remediation and clean-ups will be discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing; ENV 386 recommended.
  
  • ENV 370 - Principles of Soil Science

    (4)
    Soil science, weathering processes, weathering products, soil mineralogy, nutrients and trace elements, soil use and management. Field and lab work accompany lecture.
  
  • ENV 373 - Water Resources

    (3)
    Analysis of natural water systems, introductory hydrology, the chemistry of eutrophication, and wastewater systems. Emphasis is on applications, including water pollution abatement and management strategies.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 158 (or 168) and sophomore standing.
  
  • ENV 375 - Introduction to Apiculture and Sustainability

    (4)
    Beekeeping, bee biology, and bee biochemistry, general hive maintenance, and the use of apiculture in sustainable agricultural practices. Field work accompanies lecture.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 113 with a grade of 2.0 or greater.
  
  • ENV 386 - Principles of Occupational Health

    (3)
    Recognition, evaluation and control of chemical and physical stresses in the workplace that may adversely affect human health.
    Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing; BIO 113, CHM 234, Physics is desirable.
  
  • ENV 387 - Industrial Hygiene Field Survey

    (3)
    Selected subjects of current interest in occupational and environmental health and review of occupational health programs at local industrial companies through site visits.
    Prerequisite(s): ENV 386 recommended.
  
  • ENV 388 - Occupational Health Control Methods

    (3)
    Theory and practice in the control of occupational health hazards, including personal protective equipment, noise, radiation, ventilation and engineering design.
    Prerequisite(s): ENV 386 recommended.
  
  • ENV 389 - African Environmental History

    (4)
    Identical with HST 389.
    Prerequisite(s): WRT 160.
  
  • ENV 390 - Directed Studies

    (1 to 6)
    Studies in special areas, often individually arranged. May be repeated for credit. Preparation of study plan and instructor’s approval are required before registration. Graded S/U.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  • ENV 410 - Human Adaptation

    (4)
    Identical with AN 410.
  
  • ENV 446 - Industrial and Environmental Toxicology

    (3)
    Introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of toxicology with special attention given to the industrial environment. Evaluation of the toxic effects of substances and toxic responses to various substances. Principles of toxicology applied to biological systems: exposure, biotransformations, mechanisms of toxicity, dose-response relationships and factors influencing toxicity. Identical with OSH 446. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): an organic chemistry course.
  
  • ENV 452 - Environmental Management Systems

    (3)
    Problems of air and water pollution, solid waste management, hazardous material handling, life cycle analyses and pollution control examined from several viewpoints. Solutions to pollution problems, control technologies, practical aspects and compliance with regulations.
    Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing, CHM 158 (or 168).
  
  • ENV 461 - Environmental Law and Policies

    (3)
    Legislative and legal perspectives on environmental and occupational health issues. Special emphasis on current laws and regulations, as well as their impact on the groups regulated.
    Prerequisite(s): sophomore standing.
  
  • ENV 470 - Environmental Science Internship

    (3)
    Supervised practical experiences in an environmental health setting. Weekly journal and a written paper required. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): junior standing. Permission of instructor.
  
  • ENV 474 - Industrial Hygiene Monitoring Methods

    (3)
    Sampling and analysis of occupational health hazards and evaluation of the effectiveness of industrial hygiene control methods in laboratory and field locations.
    Prerequisite(s): ENV 386 recommended.
  
  • ENV 480 - Biogeochemical Cycling

    (3)
    Nutrient cycle, environmental contamination, remediation, sustainable agriculture, land use and management.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 158, ENV 308.
  
  • ENV 485 - Environmental Fate and Transport

    (3)
    Distribution and transformation of chemical pollutants in air, water and soil. Topics include chemical equilibrium and mass transport processes, biotic and abiotic transformations, hydrology, and physiochemical properties of chemical pollutants that affect transport, accumulation and degradation.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 234.
  
  • ENV 486 - Toxic Substance Control

    (3)
    Quantification and management of toxic substances, including production, use, distribution, exposure and control. Risk assessment and regulatory strategies will be emphasized.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 111, 113; CHM 234.
  
  • ENV 487 - Natural Resource Management

    (3)
    Oil, gas and metallic ore exploration and exploitation. Contamination issues and remediation strategies. Special emphasis on real data analysis. Students will produce and present a comprehensive management plan production based on these data.
    Prerequisite(s): ENV 309.

Exercise Science

  
  • EXS 103 - Exercise (Strength Training) and Health Enhancement

    (2)
    Examination of lifestyle factors related to disease prevention and improved quality of life. Combines regular strength training exercise and health enhancement lectures. Offered all semesters.
  
  • EXS 105 - Cardiovascular Fitness Training

    (2)
    Examination of lifestyle factors related to disease prevention and improved quality of life. Combines exposure to walking-jogging exercise, aerobics exercise, standard cardiovascular training equipment, swimming exercise and health enhancement lectures. Offered all semesters.
  
  • EXS 202 - Introduction to Exercise Science

    (2)
    Introduction to the basic concepts from different areas of exercise science (e.g. motor learning, exercise physiology, biomechanics). Offered summer semester.
  
  • EXS 203 - Group Exercise Instruction I

    (2)
    Theory and practice of safe and effective exercise instruction for individual and group resistance training programs. Excellent preparation for personal training. Focus on program design, practical skills of exercise instruction, progression, effective communication, facilities and equipment, legal issues, and risk management. Summer semester
    Prerequisite(s): EXS 103 or instructor permission.
  
  • EXS 204 - Weight Control, Nutrition and Exercise

    (4)
    Exploration of the role of exercise and optimal nutrition in weight control/loss. Emphasis on effective eating, energy balance, physiology of weight loss, behavior modification and health risks of obesity. Includes practical laboratory experiences. Recommended for students wishing to develop successful weight loss/control skills and improved nutritional habits. Fall, winter and summer semesters.
  
  • EXS 205 - Group Exercise Instruction II

    (2)
    Theory and practice of safe and effective exercise instruction for group aerobic exercise training programs. Focus on training class styles and formats, practical skills of exercise instruction, progression, cueing, pattern building, choreography, and learning styles including visual, kinesthetic and auditory. Land-and water-based programs. Summer semester.
    Prerequisite(s): EXS 105, EXS 203 or instructor permission.
  
  • EXS 207 - Safety and First Aid in Exercise Settings

    (2)
    Understanding of procedures in the immediate and temporary care of victims of an accident or sudden illness in exercise settings. Safety concerns regarding exercise facilities, equipment and programs. Certification in American Red Cross “Responding to Emergencies” and “Basic Life Support” upon completion. Fall, winter, and summer semesters.
  
  • EXS 215 - Stress Management

    (2)
    Concepts and techniques to enable students to manage stress more effectively. Offered every term.
  
  • EXS 304 - Exercise Physiology

    (3)
    Effects of exercise and physical training on the physiological systems of the body, with emphasis on cardio-respiratory systems. Includes muscle contraction mechanisms, circulatory and respiratory adjustment during exercise, and nutrition for physical activity. Cross-listed with AHS 304.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 111 and BIO 207.
    Corequisite(s): EXS 306.
  
  • EXS 306 - Exercise Physiology Laboratory

    (1)
    Laboratory experiences are provided for insight into the dynamics of human movement from research and clinical perspectives. Cross-listed with AHS 306.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 111 and BIO 207.
    Corequisite(s): EXS 304.
  
  • EXS 321 - Basic Athletic Training

    (2)
    Course directed to competitive sports and the recognition and immediate care of athletic injuries. Evaluation and treatment procedures and techniques are presented and practiced. Identical with PT 321. Credit will not be awarded for both EXS 321 and EXS 521.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 205, BIO 207, EXS 350.
  
  • EXS 350 - Human Motion Analysis

    (4)
    The anatomical kinesiology and the mechanical bases of human movement in daily life, exercise rehabilitation, sport, and work settings are analyzed. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 205.
  
  • EXS 360 - Healthy Lifestyle Choices

    (2)
    A biopsychosocial approach to exercise and other healthy lifestyle choices. Focus is on the dimensions of wellness, factors influencing lifestyle choices, the theory and practice of behavior change, and health promotion concepts. Credit will not be granted for both EXS 360 and EXS 560. Offered all semesters.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 100, EXS 204 or EXS 304 or HS 201.
  
  • EXS 401 - Practicum in Exercise Science

    (5)
    Supervised exercise science experience in a program-approved setting with application of HS/EXS and general education knowledge. Students demonstrate exercise science competencies, keep a daily journal, write a critical analysis of the experience, and successfully pass site supervisor evaluation. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience. All semesters.
    Prerequisite(s): HS 201, EXS 304, EXS 350, completion of general education knowledge foundation courses, and EXS program director permission.
  
  • EXS 403 - Human Performance Enhancement

    (2)
    Advanced topics and trends in modern strength and conditioning program design and implementation. Topics include muscle physiology, neuromuscular physiology, performance, profiles, periodization, and the theory behind developing adequate strength, mass, flexibility, power, and stability programs. Credit will not be awarded for both EXS 403 and EXS 503.
    Prerequisite(s): EXS 103 or instructor permission.
  
  • EXS 405 - Health and Disease

    (2)
    Examination of the health and medical record with a focus on the history, physical exam, and laboratory and imaging studies. The pathogenesis of representative diseases that are lifestyle related are emphasized. Credit will not be granted for both EXS 405 and EXS 505. Offered summer semester.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 111 and BIO 207, or instructor permission. BIO 205 recommended.
  
  • EXS 406 - The Brain and Disease

    (2)
    Reviews current neurological research on the brain in health and disease including addiction, depression, stroke, viral infections, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Emphasis on multidisciplinary research studies on the role of exercise and nutritional antioxidants. Identical with HS 406. Summer elective.
    Prerequisite(s): EXS 304, HS 401 or instructor permission.
  
  • EXS 410 - Clinical Biomechanics

    (2)
    The pathomechanics of the human musculoskeletal system. Topics include properties of human tissue, mechanisms of injury, pathokinesiology, and principles of musculoskeletal exercise prescription. Credit will not be granted for both EXS 410 and EXS 610. Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
    Prerequisite(s): EXS 350 or instructor permission.
  
  • EXS 415 - Exercise Endocrinology

    (2)
    A cellular and systems physiology approach to human hormone function during exercise. Interaction of neuron-endocrine responses during exercise and body fluid regulation, homeostasis, the immune system, regulation of fuel use, biological rhythms, reproductive cycles, analgesia and tissue repair. Hormones as ergogenic aids. Offered summer term.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 207 and EXS 304 or instructor permission.
  
  • EXS 416 - Physical Activity Epidemiology

    (2)
    Explores the evolution of epidemiology and its impact on physical activity choices and guidelines. Topics will include the role of physical activity in the primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of chronic disease, mental health problems, and disability from an epidemiologic perspective. Offered Summer semester.
    Prerequisite(s): STA 225 or PSY 251 .
  
  • EXS 425 - Exercise Electrocardiography

    (2)
    Theoretical and applied concepts of resting and exercise electrocardiography (ECG), the normal ECG, and factors contributing to abnormal ECG. Students experience exercise test applications of the ECG and learn to recognize life-threatening arrhythmias. Credit will not be granted for both EXS 425 and 625. Offered summer semester.
    Prerequisite(s): EXS 304 or instructor permission.
  
  • EXS 435 - Environment and Human Performance

    (2)
    Human adaptation to major factors that can significantly influence human movement in diverse micro- and macro-environments, including temperature, altitude, precipitation, light, noise and socio-cultural factors. Credit will not be granted for both EXS 435 and EXS 635. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered years.
    Prerequisite(s): EXS 304.
  
  • EXS 445 - Physical Activity and Aging

    (2)
    The effects of aging on physical work capacity, body composition, and cardiovascular, pulmonary, neuromuscular and musculoskeletal function. The principles for prescribing and conducting physical conditioning programs to retard the aging process are included. Credit will not be granted for both EXS 445 and EXS 545. Offered summer term.
    Prerequisite(s): EXS 304 and EXS 350.
  
  • EXS 450 - Children and Exercise

    (2)
    Physical activity and the growth, maturation, motor development, and motor learning of children from birth through adolescence. Skill and performance enhancement, exercise program design, biomechanics, and injury and disease prevention are discussed. Credit will not be granted for both EXS 450 and EXS 550. Offered summer term in odd-numbered years.
    Prerequisite(s): EXS 304 and EXS 350.
  
  • EXS 465 - Corporate and Worksite Wellness Programs

    (2)
    Concepts underlying corporate and worksite health promotion programs, including: health and exercise program planning, facility planning and design, program management, staffing, equipment selection, safety and legal issues, and marketing. Credit will not be granted for both EXS 465 and EXS 565. Offered summer semester.
    Prerequisite(s): EXS 304 or instructor permission.
  
  • EXS 470 - Introduction to Personal Training

    (2)
    An introduction to the concepts used in personal training. Covers theoretical knowledge and practical skills needed to prepare for a national certification exam in personal training. Topics include exercise testing, prescription, and leading, progression, individualization, goal-setting, logistics, client motivation, safety health promoting behaviors and effective communication. Offered summer semester.
    Prerequisite(s): EXS 103, 304, 306, 350.
  
  • EXS 475 - Advanced Personal Training

    (2)
    Theoretical knowledge and practical skills in advanced personal training including training for special cases: high-performance athletes, musculoskeletal injuries, wheel-chair bound clients, chronic diseases, the elderly, and children. Periodization, plyometrics, exercise with specialized equipment, innovative use of available resources, and best practices for commercial success also covered. Offered summer semester.
    Prerequisite(s): EXS 470.
  
  • EXS 483 - Special Topics

    (1 to 4)
    An advanced course involving study of current topics in the practical application of exercise principles. Topics vary. May be repeated for additional credit.
    Prerequisite(s): program director permission.
  
  • EXS 493 - Directed Study and Research

    (1 to 4)
    Special study areas and research in exercise science. May be repeated for additional credit. Offered every semester.
    Prerequisite(s): program permission.

Finance

  
  • FIN 300 - Survey of Finance

    (3)
    Course helps students develop a basic understanding of Finance. Topics covered include: (1) financial instruments and the markets in which they are traded, (2) financial planning and analysis, (3) the cost and time-value of money, and (4) the fundamentals of investor decision-making. Business majors, pre-business students and business undecided students cannot take this course.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 200 or ACC 300 and junior standing.
  
  • FIN 322 - Managerial Finance I

    (4)
    The basic elements of managerial finance. Topics include: capital budgeting techniques, financial structure and analysis, the cost of capital, working capital management and international financial management.
    Prerequisite(s): ((ECN 201 and (ECN 200 or ECN 202)) or ECN 210) and ACC 210 and (QMM 241 or QMM 250 or STA 226) with a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course.
  
  • FIN 399 - Achieve III - Finance

    (0)
    Guide students through the job search process within the Finance major.
    Prerequisite(s): major standing and SBC 199 and SBC 299.
  
  • FIN 416 - Investment Analysis

    (3)
    Provides a general framework for constructing portfolios and valuing investments. Important concepts include portfolio theory, credit analysis, valuation of call and conversions features on debt instruments, and fundamental analysis of equities and foreign assets.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 322 and (ACC 301 or ACC 310) with a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course.
  
  • FIN 417 - Investment Portfolio Management

    (3)
    Analyzes trading in different types of spot and foreign assets, futures, options, and investment companies. Tax, transaction cost, and regulatory issues are evaluated, as are asset allocation and timing strategies, technical analysis, hedging, arbitrage, and portfolio management within the context of a financial plan.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 322 with a minimum grade of 2.0 and major standing.
  
  • FIN 418 - Financial Institutions and Capital Markets

    (3)
    Focus is on the structure and operations of financial intermediaries, analysis of innovative financial instruments, and credit and interest-rate risk management.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 322 with a minimum grade of 2.0 and major standing.
  
  • FIN 419 - International Financial Management

    (3)
    The application of the tools of financial analysis to cases and the problems of firms that have operations in several countries.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 322 with a minimum grade of 2.0 and major standing.
  
  • FIN 420 - Real Estate Investment Analysis

    (3)
    A look at acquisition, financing and sale of income-producing real estate. Topics to be covered include feasibility, appraisal, investment, financing and taxation.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 322 with a minimum grade of 2.0 and major standing.
  
  • FIN 422 - Managerial Finance II

    (3)
    The application of the tools of financial analysis to specific cases in the financial management of corporate businesses and nonprofit enterprises.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 322 and (ACC 301 or ACC 310) with a minimum grade of 2.0 in each course.
  
  • FIN 480 - Special Topics in Finance

    (3)
    Intensive study of a selected finance topic. The topic will vary from term to term. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
    Prerequisite(s): FIN 322 with a minimum grade of 2.0 and major standing.
  
  • FIN 490 - Independent Study

    (1 to 3)
    Qualified and highly motivated students may engage in individual research, directed readings or group study under the supervision of a faculty member. Offered every term. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
    Prerequisite(s): an overall GPA of 3.00 or better, major standing, and an approved contract prior to registration.

Foundations of Education

  
  • FE 301 - Human Nature

    (4)
    An analysis of human nature through evolutionary, developmental, cultural and philosophical perspectives. Implications for the helping professions.
  
  • FE 310 - Social and Philosophical Issues in Elementary Education

    (4)
    Study of elementary education in broad perspective, as both an interpersonal activity and a social institution. Topics include immediate and ultimate aims of elementary education, social and cultural differences within and between schools, and assumptions underlying school policy. Includes a required field experience.
    Prerequisite(s): admission to major.
  
  • FE 315 - Educational Psychology for Elementary Teachers

    (4)
    Incorporates and places into perspective learning theories, developmental theories, biological theories and evaluation, with emphasis on the effects of varied qualities of experience during childhood and early adolescence. Incudes a required field experience.
    Prerequisite(s): admission to major.
  
  • FE 344 - Social and Philosophical Issues in Secondary Education

    (4)
    Study of secondary education in broad perspective, as both an interpersonal activity and a social institution. Topics include immediate and ultimate aims of secondary education, social and cultural differences within and between schools, and assumptions underlying school policy.
  
  • FE 345 - Educational Psychology for Secondary Teachers

    (4)
    Psychological factors in learning and development are examined in lectures, class discussions and observations. These may be observations of actual teaching in the schools, or of videotapes of teaching. Attention to regular and exceptional development during the adolescent years. Required field experience: 30 clock hours of observation and interaction in local secondary classrooms in the student’s minor area during the semester enrolled.
    Prerequisite(s): admission to secondary education program.
  
  • FE 406 - Educational Psychology for K-12 Educators

    (4)
    Development and stage theories of cognition and learning behavior, examined through research accounts of physical and mental variability, cultural background, social circumstances, lived experience, learning style and mode of cultural interactivity. Admission to major. Required field experience. Crosslisted with FE 506.

French Language

  
  • FRH 114 - Introduction to French Language and Culture I

    (4)
    A two-semester sequence in the fundamentals of French and French culture. A beginning course. FRH 114 must be taken first. FRH 114 or 115 satisfies the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
  
  • FRH 115 - Introduction to French Language and Culture II

    (4)
    A two-semester sequence in the fundamentals of French and French culture. A beginning course, FRH 114, must be taken first. FRH 114 or 115 satisfies the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
  
  • FRH 119 - Accelerated Review of Elementary French and French Culture

    (4)
    One-semester course designed to review the fundamentals of French and French culture. Designed for students who have three or more years of previous French experience. Covers the same materials as the two-semester sequence French 114-115. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
  
  • FRH 214 - Second Year French I

    (4)
    Two-semester sequence continuing the work of FRH 114-115 with the addition of cultural and literary readings. FRH 214 must be taken first. FRH 214 or FRH 215 satisfies the university general education requirement in the foreign language and cultural knowledge exploration area or the knowledge application integration area, not both. Prerequisite for knowledge application integration: completion of the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): one year of college French or equivalent.
  
  • FRH 215 - Second Year French II

    (4)
    Two-semester sequence continuing the work of FRH 114-115 with the addition of cultural and literary readings. FRH 214 must be taken first. FRH 214 or FRH 215 satisfies the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area or the knowledge application integration area, not both. Prerequisite for knowledge application integration: completion of the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): One year of college French or equivalent.
  
  • FRH 216 - Basic French Conversation

    (2)
    Designed to develop the student’s ability to organize and express ideas in French with a minimum of inhibition.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 115.
  
  • FRH 290 - Directed Readings in French

    (2 or 4)
    A reading course for non-majors in research in a particular area. Approximately 50 hours of reading per credit. One conference weekly with the instructor.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 215.
  
  • FRH 312 - French Phonetics and Listening Comprehension

    (2)
    Group and individual practice in the sound system of French, with special attention to listening comprehension problems. Both written and laboratory work required. Offered fall semester.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 215.
  
  • FRH 314 - French Grammar Review

    (4)
    Review of French grammar through a variety of approaches such as reading, translation and composition. Conducted in French. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 215.
  
  • FRH 316 - French Conversation

    (2)
    Practice in speaking at intermediate level. Format may include oral presentations and phonetics. Offered winter semester.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 215.
  
  • FRH 318 - French Composition

    (2)
    Practice in written composition. Techniques of textual analysis and exposition are introduced. Offered fall semester. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 215. FRH 314 highly recommended.
  
  • FRH 351 - French Civilization

    (4)
    An overview of contemporary life, education and socio-economic conditions in France. Conducted in French. Offered in fall semester.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 215.
  
  • FRH 355 - Translation into English

    (4)
    Translation from French to English of materials that may range from commercial and technical to literary. Offered winter semester.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 314.
  
  • FRH 357 - French Business Communication

    (4)
    Introduction to basic business communication skills, including essential reading, writing and speaking activities. Offered in alternate years.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 314.
  
  • FRH 370 - Introduction to French Literature

    (4)
    An introduction to textual analysis based on selected readings. Conducted in French. Offered fall semester.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 215, FRH 314 is highly recommended.
  
  • FRH 380 - Survey of French Literature

    (4)
    A survey of French literature. Intended to supplement the work of FRH 370. Conducted in French. Offered winter semester.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 370.
  
  • FRH 390 - Directed Readings in French

    (2 or 4)
    Directed individual readings in French. May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  • FRH 408 - Advanced French Conversation

    (2)
    Practice in speaking at an advanced level. Format may include oral presentations and readings.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 316.
  
  • FRH 416 - French Literature from the Middle Ages through the Sixteenth Century

    (4)
    A study of works in various genres of several periods. Works and authors may include epics, bawdy tales, courtly romances, Villon, Rabelais and Montaigne. Conducted in French. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 314, 370 and 380.
  
  • FRH 417 - French Literature - Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

    (4)
    A study of works in various genres by leading French authors such as Pascal, Corneille, Racine, Moliere, La Fontaine, Montesquieu, Diderot, Rousseau and Voltaire. Conducted in French. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 314, 370 and 380.
  
  • FRH 419 - French Literature - Nineteenth Century

    (4)
    A study of works in various genres by leading French authors such as Stendhal, Balzac, Hugo, Nerval, Flaubert, Zola, Baudelaire and Mallarme. Conducted in French. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 314, 370 and 380.
  
  • FRH 420 - French Literature - Twentieth Century

    (4)
    Study of contemporary genres demonstrating different approaches to study of works in various genres by leading French and francophone authors from 1900 to the present. May include works by Gide, Proust, Sartre, Beauvoir, Duras, Ionesco, Valery, Conde, Djebar, among others. Conducted in French. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement. Satisifes the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 314, 370 and 380.
  
  • FRH 455 - Translation Into French

    (4)
    Translation from English into French of a wide variety of materials that may range from commercial and technical to literary. Offered fall semester in alternate years.
    Prerequisite(s): FRH 314, 316, and 318.
 

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