Jun 20, 2024  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 The department offers selected courses from this catalog as warranted by student needs and availability of faculty. Specific offerings for each term may be found in the Schedule of Classes.
 

 

Biology

  
  • BIO 419 - Advanced Genetics

    (4)
    A continuation of BIO 341. Topics include methods of gene discovery through analysis of genetic variation, genetics of complex traits (in which multiple genes and environment interact), non-classical modes of inheritance, and applied topics such as the use of genetics in medicine and forensics.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 341 and either STA 225 or STA 226.
  
  • BIO 421 - Medical Microbiology

    (4)
    Bacterial and viral human pathogens, emphasizing their etiology, physiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology, control and diagnosis.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 325.
  
  • BIO 423 - Immunology

    (4)
    Human immune response. Emphasis on components of the immune system, antibody structure and function, antigen processing and presentation, T cell responses, immune response to infectious diseases, and disorders of the immune system.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 341 or 325.
  
  • BIO 425 - Biochemistry II

    (4)
    A continuation of BIO 325 using the same textbook. Topics include photosynthesis, metabolism of lipids and nitrogen-containing compounds, biochemical mechanisms of hormone action, integration and control of cell metabolism, biochemistry of nucleic acids, and mechanisms of gene transcription and protein synthesis.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 325.
  
  • BIO 427 - Cell Biology of Cancer

    (4)
    Introduction to cancer from signal transduction pathways that regulate cell proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion and migration. Offered winter semester.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 309.
  
  • BIO 429 - Stem Cell Biology

    (4)
    Comprehensive overview of stem cells and their potential in biomedical research and applications. Aspects of basic, applied biology and medicine including development and differentiation, cancer, regeneration/repair, cell therapy, and drug development. Provides a broad background and the opportunity to apply critical thinking skills to recent advances in stem cell biology.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 111.
  
  • BIO 430 - Research Associate Program I

    (4)
    Structured research learning experience for pre-medical students; basic concepts, topics of clinical research, and structure of clinical research; clinical epidemiology, evidence-based medicine, data analysis, relevant medical pathophysiology, diagnostics and therapeutics.
    Prerequisite(s): junior standing.
  
  • BIO 432 - Research Associate Program II

    (4)
    Structured research learning experience for pre-medical students; advanced concepts, topics of clinical research, and structure for clinical research; clinical epidemiology, evidence-based medicine, data analysis, relevant medical pathophysiology, diagnostics and therapeutics.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 430.
  
  • BIO 437 - Virology

    (4)
    Fundamentals of virology including classification of bacteriophages, plant and animal viruses, viral multiplication, and pathogenesis.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 309, 315, 319, or 325.
  
  • BIO 441 - Microbial Biotechnology

    (4)
    Microbial genetics, emphasizing the basic aspects of bacteriophage and plasmid genetics applied to biotechnology.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 341 or BIO 319.
  
  • BIO 443 - Functional Genomics and Bioinformatics

    (4)
    Use and implementation of computer software for sequence analysis of nucleic acids and proteins. Emphasis on gene discovery, annotation, building phylogenetic histories, and state-of-the-art strategies used for gene expression analysis of an organism from a genome-wide perspective.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 341.
  
  • BIO 444 - Functional Genomics and Bioinformatics Laboratory

    (1)
    Explores molecular biology, genomics and bioinformatics techniques useful in study of genomes and proteomes.
    Pre/Corequisite(s): BIO 443.
  
  • BIO 445 - Principles of Evolutionary Medicine

    (4)
    Introduction to the principles of evolutionary biology and their application to understanding human disease and medically relevant topics including the development of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria and an understanding of how viral evolution impacts vaccine production.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 207 or 321, and BIO 475.
  
  • BIO 451 - Research Forum

    (1)
    A forum for students to present their research in a seminar environment and to discuss problems and potential solutions with other students and department faculty. May be repeated for up to 4 credits. Graded S/U.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of faculty supervisor.
  
  • BIO 460 - Neuroanatomy

    (4)
    The brain, brain stem, spinal cord and associated structures with respect to their morphology, development, function and the integration of these functions in motor activity. Certain lesions and their clinical significance will be discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 205 or 381.
  
  • BIO 461 - Neuroanatomy Laboratory

    (1)
    Laboratory experience in neuroanatomy. Identification of basic neuroanatomical structures of the human.
    Corequisite(s): BIO 460.
  
  • BIO 465 - Medical Parasitology and Mycology

    (4)
    Integrated lecture-lab. Study of medically important protozoan, helminth, arthropod and mycotic organisms; their morphology, biology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, immunology, epidemiology and control. Laboratory methods for identification of medically important parasites.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 111, 113, 116.
  
  • BIO 471 - Stream Ecology

    (3)
    Introduction to the ecology of streams and rivers. Topics include river restoration, nutrient cycling, stream food webs, fluvial geomorphology, watershed hydrology, invasive aquatic and riparian species, and riparian ecology.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 113; BIO 301 recommended.
  
  • BIO 473 - Biochemistry of Metabolism and Disease

    (4)
    Biochemistry of the metabolic processes and interrelations existing in healthy and disease states in human systems. Covers both metabolic disorders as well as insights to clinical biochemistry related to cancer, myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis and other diseases.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 207 or BIO 321; BIO 325, CHM 453 or BCM 453.
  
  • BIO 474 - Tropical Field Ecology

    (3)
    Field-based introduction to tropical ecology with an emphasis on experiencing different types of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 301 recommended and instructor permission.
  
  • BIO 475 - Human Genetics

    (4)
    Introduction to classical and molecular inheritance, genetic processes of humans with particular emphasis on human genetic diseases. Topics include gene mapping, genetic diseases, molecular screening.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 207 or 321.
  
  • BIO 481 - Topics in Physiological Ecology

    (3)
    Physiological responses of organisms to their environment including plant/herbivore interactions, adaptations of desert animals, allelopathy, energy cost of animal activities, and communication on an organismal level. Offered alternate winter semesters.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 207, 301 or 321.
  
  • BIO 482 - Topics in Evolutionary Biology

    (3)
    Advanced topics in evolutionary biology, including evolutionary patterns, the nature of selection, adaptation, macroevolution, the application of molecular biology to evolution and philosophical issues of evolution. Offered alternate fall semesters.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 301, BIO 353, and BIO 387 or permission of instructor.
  
  • BIO 483 - Topics in Community and Population Biology

    (3)
    Analytic and synthetic approaches to the biology of populations and communities utilizing both plant and animal studies. Topics will include population growth and regulation, competition, predatorprey interactions, community structure and species diversity. Offered alternate fall semesters.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 301 or 387.
  
  • BIO 484 - Topics in Behavioral Biology

    (3)
    The ecology, evolution, genetics and physiology of behavior, especially social behavior. Topics will include kin recognition, mate choice, dominance hierarchies and the mechanisms by which societies are organized. Offered alternate winter semesters.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 353.
  
  • BIO 487 - Science of Vision

    (3)
    In-depth study of the tissues of the eye. Topics include visual transduction, light and dark adaptation, color vision, lens physiology and cataract, cornea, glaucoma, inherited retinal diseases, diabetic retinopathy, physiological optics, and regulation of gene expression in ocular development.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 207 or BIO 321 or BIO 351.
  
  • BIO 490 - Independent Research

    (1 to 4)
    Directed undergraduate research in laboratory, field or theoretical biology. Should be initiated before or during the junior year. May be taken for a numeric grade (research paper required) by written arrangement with a biology faculty supervisor for a maximum of 4 credits. May be taken for an S/U grade (no paper required) by written arrangement with a biology supervisor for a maximum of 8 credits. BIO 490 counts as one laboratory course for the major.
    Prerequisite(s): written agreement with a biology faculty supervisor.
  
  • BIO 491 - Selected Topics in Biology

    (1 to 5)
    Advanced topics in a specialized area of biological sciences. The topics and prerequisites may vary. May be repeated for additional credit.
  
  • BIO 492 - Scientific Inquiry

    (1)
    Integrative laboratory based experience focused on a single medically relevant topic. Exercises will range from basic cell/biochemical to virtual simulations of physiological processes to data mining of available biomedical databases through societal impacts.
    Prerequisite(s): instructor permission.
  
  • BIO 493 - Integrative Pharmacology

    (3)
    Introduction to human pharmacology with emphasis on an integrative approach to encompass clinical application, physiological functions, pharmacological principles, biochemistry of actions. Offered fall semester.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 207 or 321, and BIO 325.
  
  • BIO 495 - Scientific Inquiry and Communication

    (4)
    Synthesis of several sub disciplines in biological sciences using technical reports, articles in the popular press and on the Internet. Integration of life sciences with history, fine arts, other cultures, social and ethical issues addressed through a variety of methods of inquiry with emphasis on communication skills and critical thinking. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): junior standing.
  
  • BIO 497 - Apprentice College Teaching

    (2)
    Assisting in presenting a course, usually a laboratory course, to undergraduates. May be taken more than once. Cannot be counted as a biology laboratory course.
    Prerequisite(s): written agreement with a biology faculty supervisor.
  
  • BIO 499 - Integrative Biomedicine and Disease

    (3)
    Investigation of clinically relevant diseases using an integration of biological subdisciplines. Technical reports, journal articles, and articles in the popular press, historical records, and internet resources will be used to investigate treatment of pathological conditions, cultural effects of diseases, historical impacts and ethics of managing different diseases. Oral and written communication and critical thinking skills will be emphasized. Offered winter semester.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 493.

Chemistry

  
  • CHM 104 - Introduction to Chemical Principles

    (4)
    Study of principles of general chemistry. Prepares students for CHM 201. Recommended preparation: high school algebra and chemistry. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the natural science and technology knowledge exploration area. Students must attend four general education laboratory sessions during the semester.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 061 with a minimum grade of 2.0 or placement in MTH 062 or higher MTH course.
  
  • CHM 143 - Chemical Principles

    (4)
    States of matter, atomic structure, bonding and molecular structure, chemical reactions. This course has common lectures with CHM 157. CHM 143 does not satisfy the university general education requirement in the natural science and technology knowledge exploration area. Recommended preparation is three years of high school mathematics and one year of high school chemistry. Restricted to engineering and computer science majors.
    Prerequisite(s): Score of 20 or higher on ACT mathematics exam; or MTH 062.
  
  • CHM 147 - General Chemistry Laboratory I

    (1)
    Experimental investigation of chemical phenomena and measurements. This laboratory will not appear in the schedule of classes; students must obtain permission from the chemistry department adviser to register.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 143 and permission of chemistry adviser.
  
  • CHM 148 - General Chemistry Laboratory II

    (1)
    Training in the basic techniques of chemistry experimentation. This laboratory will not appear in the schedule of classes; students must obtain permission from the chemistry department adviser to register.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 157 and permission of chemistry adviser.
  
  • CHM 157 - General Chemistry I

    (5)
    Integrated lecture-laboratory. States of matter, atomic structure, bonding and molecular structure, chemical reactions. Recommended preparation is three years of high school mathematics and one year of high school chemistry. CHM 157 satisfies the university general education requirement in the natural science and technology knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): Score of 20 or higher on ACT mathematics exam; or MTH 062.
  
  • CHM 158 - General Chemistry II

    (5)
    Integrated lecture-laboratory. Chemical reactions, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, thermodynamics and electrochemistry.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 143 and 147, or CHM 157.
  
  • CHM 162 - Honors General Chemistry for Engineers I

    (4)
    Intensive introduction to chemistry in a small-class setting including selected research areas in chemistry. This course has common lectures with CHM 167 and is recommended for engineering majors with strong high school preparation in chemistry, physics, and mathematics. CHM 162 does not satisfy the university general education requirement in natural science and technology knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): one year of high school chemistry and physics and placement in MTH 154 or higher or math ACT score of 25 or higher.
  
  • CHM 163 - Honors General Chemistry for Engineers II

    (4)
    A more intensive treatment of the topics in CHM 158 including selected research areas in chemistry in a small-class setting. This course has common lectures with CHM 168.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 162 or 167.
  
  • CHM 167 - Honors General Chemistry I

    (5)
    Integrated lecture-laboratory. A more intensive introduction to the topics in CHM 157 including selected research areas in chemistry in a small-class setting. CHM 167 satisfies the university general education requirement in the natural science and technology knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): one year of high school chemistry and physics and placement in MTH 154 or higher or math ACT score of 25 or higher.
  
  • CHM 168 - Honors General Chemistry II

    (5)
    Integrated lecture-laboratory. A more intensive treatment of the topics in CHM 158 including selected research areas in chemistry in a small-class setting.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 157 or 167.
  
  • CHM 201 - Introduction to Organic and Biological Chemistry

    (4)
    Brief survey of organic and biological chemistry, emphasizing applications to human physiology. CHM 201 may not be used for major or minor credit in chemistry, biology or physics, except for the STEP minor in chemistry.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 104.
  
  • CHM 220 - Introduction to Computational Chemistry

    (2)
    An introduction to the use of modern computational methods for the solution of chemical problems, with emphasis on the use of high-level software packages. Topics include elementary computational procedures, statistical treatment of experimental data, graphical methods, and an introduction to molecular modeling. No computer programming experience required.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 158 or 168; MTH 154 or MTH 122 recommended.
  
  • CHM 234 - Organic Chemistry I

    (4)
    Introduction to the structure, properties and reactivity of organic compounds.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 158 or 168.
  
  • CHM 235 - Organic Chemistry II

    (4)
    A continuation of CHM 234. A study of the organic chemistry of functional groups and an introduction to biologically important organic compounds.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 234.
  
  • CHM 237 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    (2)
    Basic organic laboratory manipulations at the semi-micro level, synthesis, spectroscopy and chromatography.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 158 or 168 and CHM 234.
  
  • CHM 290 - Introduction to Research

    (1 to 4)
    Introduction to laboratory research for students with no previous research experience. May be repeated for credit. Graded S/U.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  • CHM 300 - Chemistry, Society & Health

    (4)
    Designed for non-science majors and STEP chemistry majors and minors. Applies chemistry to environmental topics including smog, ozone depletion, global climate changes, water pollution, acid rain, fossil fuel and nuclear and alternative energies. Several in-class laboratory experiences included. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the natural science and technology knowledge exploration area. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both.
    Prerequisite(s): completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
  
  • CHM 325 - Analytical Chemistry

    (4)
    Acid-base, complexation, precipitation, oxidation-reduction and phase-distribution principles, along with fundamentals of spectroscopy, chromatography and statistics, are studied and applied to chemical analysis. Four hours of lecture and eight hours of laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 158 or 168.
  
  • CHM 342 - Physical Chemistry I

    (4)
    Kinetics, applications of thermodynamics to chemical systems and equilibria.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 158 or 168, MTH 155 and PHY 152.
  
  • CHM 343 - Physical Chemistry II

    (4)
    Introduction to quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics and molecular spectroscopy. This course may be taken before CHM 342.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 158 or 168, MTH 155 and PHY 152.
  
  • CHM 348 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    (2)
    Experiments in thermodynamics, kinetics, phase equilibria, and advanced spectroscopy with emphasis on mathematical treatment of experimental data. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 220, 325 and 342 or 343.
  
  • CHM 362 - Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry

    (3)
    Structure, bonding and reactivity of inorganic compounds.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 235.
  
  • CHM 400 - Seminar

    (0)
    Discussions of recent advances and topics of current interest; reports. Graded S/U.
    Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.
  
  • CHM 410 - Environmental Chemistry

    (3)
    Concepts from atmospheric and aquatic chemistry as it is applied to the environment such as photochemistry, global warming, ozone depletion, carbon cycle, equilibrium principles, acids and bases, complexation and dissolution, and electron transfer processes. Current topics in environmental issues and analytical methods will be discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 234.
  
  • CHM 412 - Atmospheric Chemistry

    (3)
    Chemistry of atmospheric gases and aerosols. Environmental issues (stratospheric ozone depletion, global warming, photochemical smog, acid rain, biosphere/atmosphere interactions). Concepts (lifetimes, sources, sinks, transport, global cycles). Social issues (air quality standards, effects of air pollutants). Measurement techniques.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 342.
  
  • CHM 413 - Environmental Aquatic Chemistry

    (3)
    Applications of inorganic and organic chemistry in natural waters pertaining to environmental concerns. Topics include acid-base reactions, buffer systems, mineral precipitation, chemical complexation, redox reactions, adsorption phenomena, chemical-equilibria, and the influence of organic chemicals on transfer and reaction processes in the environment.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 234.
  
  • CHM 426 - Instrumental Analysis

    (3)
    An integrated examination of contemporary analytical instrumentation including spectroscopy, electrophoresis, chromatography, and mass spectrometry. Emphasis is placed on developing a functional understanding through the analysis of samples typical of those examined in industrial laboratories. Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 325.
  
  • CHM 427 - Electrochemistry

    (3)
    Survey of electroanalytical and spectroelectrochemical methods. Includes microelectrodes and selective electrodes in bioelectrochemistry as well as electrical phenomena at the biological membrane level.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 325.
  
  • CHM 432 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

    (3)
    Selected topics in synthetic, structural and physical-organic chemistry.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 235.
  
  • CHM 438 - Inorganic/Organic Laboratory

    (2)
    Synthesis, analysis and characterization of organic and inorganic compounds.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 237 and 362. CHM 362 may be taken concurrently.
  
  • CHM 444 - Advanced Physical Chemistry

    (3)
    Introduction to statistical mechanics. Applications of quantum and statistical mechanics to chemical bonding, molecular structure and spectroscopy.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 342, 343 and MTH 254.
  
  • CHM 453 - Biochemistry I

    (3)
    First course in a comprehensive biochemistry sequence. Structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids; enzyme mechanisms, kinetics and regulation; bioenergetics and catabolism. Identical with BCM 453.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 235.
  
  • CHM 454 - Biochemistry II

    (3)
    Metabolic pathways and control; nucleic acid structure, function and processing,including regulation of gene expression. Selected topics in molecular physiology. Identical with BCM 454.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM/BCM 453.
  
  • CHM 457 - Biochemistry Laboratory

    (3)
    Techniques of extraction, separation, identification and quantification of biomolecules, including electrophoresis, chromatography and radioisotope techniques, with emphasis on mathematical treatment of experimental data. Identical with BCM 457. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM/BCM 453 which may be taken concurrently.
  
  • CHM 458 - Biochemistry Projects

    (2)
    Advanced project-oriented instruction in biochemical laboratory techniques.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 457 and permission of instructor.
  
  • CHM 463 - Inorganic Chemistry

    (3)
    Structure, bonding and reactivity of inorganic and organometallic compounds, with emphasis on transition elements and selected main group elements.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 362.
  
  • CHM 470 - Industrial Chemistry

    (3)
    Survey of the major sources and uses of chemicals, industrial chemical processes, fundamental raw materials and career paths available in the chemical industry. More intensive treatment of selected industrial processes.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 235.
  
  • CHM 471 - Structure and Synthesis of Polymers

    (3)
    Preparation, properties and structure of selected inorganic and organic polymers. Both chemical theory and technological and organic polymers. Both chemical theory and technological applications will be discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 235.
  
  • CHM 472 - Chemical and Physical Properties of Polymers

    (3)
    The molecular principles governing the physical behavior of macromolecules in solution and in the glassy and crystalline states. The mechanical behavior and structure of macromolecules.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 471 and 343 or permission of instructor.
  
  • CHM 477 - Macromolecular Laboratory

    (2)
    Introduction to the synthesis and physical characterization of synthetic polymers.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 237 and CHM 471; CHM 471 may be taken concurrently.
  
  • CHM 480 - Selected Topics

    (1 to 4)
    Advanced study in selected areas; normally involves preparation of a term paper or presentation of a seminar. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  • CHM 486 - Physical-Analytical Projects

    (1 or 2)
    Advanced experimentation in physical or analytical chemistry, with at least four hours per week per credit.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  • CHM 487 - Synthesis Projects

    (1 or 2)
    Advanced synthesis work emphasizing modern techniques, with at least four hours per week per credit.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  • CHM 490 - Research

    (1 to 8)
    Laboratory practice in undergraduate research, with at least four hours per week per credit. May be repeated for credit. Cannot be used to satisfy the chemistry major requirements for 400-level courses. Graded S/U.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  • CHM 491 - Independent Research

    (3)
    Undergraduate research with at least eight hours per week in the laboratory. Requires a written report. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): junior standing and permission of instructor.
  
  • CHM 497 - Apprentice Chemistry Teaching

    (1 or 2)
    Supervised participation in teaching undergraduate or high school courses in chemistry. May be repeated once for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

Chinese Language

  
  • CHE 114 - Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture I

    (4)
    A two-semester sequence in the fundamentals of modern Mandarin Chinese and Chinese culture. A beginning course. CHE 114 must be taken first. CHE 114 or 115 satisfies the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
  
  • CHE 115 - Introduction to Chinese Language and Culture II

    (4)
    A two-semester sequence in the fundamentals of modern Mandarin Chinese and Chinese culture. A beginning course, CHE 114, must be taken first. CHE 114 or 115 satisfies the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
  
  • CHE 214 - Second Year Chinese I

    (4)
    A two-semester sequence continuing the work of CHE 114-115, with the addition of cultural and literary readings. CHE 214 must be taken first. CHE 214 or 215 satisfies the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): one year of college Chinese or equivalent.
  
  • CHE 215 - Second Year Chinese II

    (4)
    A two-semester sequence continuing the work of CHE 114-115, with the addition of cultural and literary readings. CHE 214 must be taken first. CHE 214 or 215 satisfies the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): one year of college Chinese or equivalent.
  
  • CHE 314 - Advanced Chinese Grammar

    (4)
    Review and survey of Chinese grammar and expressions through a variety of approaches, such as reading, translation and composition. Conducted in Chinese.
    Prerequisite(s): CHE 215 or equivalent.
  
  • CHE 316 - Chinese Conversation

    (2)
    Practice in speaking at intermediate level. Format may include oral presentation and phonetics. Must be taken concurrently with CHE 318.
    Prerequisite(s): CHE 215 or equivalent.
  
  • CHE 318 - Chinese Composition

    (2)
    Practice in written composition. Techniques of textual analysis and exposition are introduced. Must be taken concurrently with CHE 316.
    Prerequisite(s): CHE 215 or equivalent.
  
  • CHE 351 - Chinese Civilization

    (4)
    Survey of Chinese culture and civilization from topical, literary and historical perspectives. Conducted in Chinese and English.
    Prerequisite(s): CHE 215 or equivalent.
  
  • CHE 355 - Translation: Chinese

    (4)
    Translation from Chinese to English of a range of materials from commercial and technical to literary.
    Prerequisite(s): CHE 215 or equivalent.
  
  • CHE 357 - Chinese Business Communication

    (4)
    Introduction to the essential vocabulary and style specific to Chinese business as well as to China’s business environment and the basic workings of its economy.
    Prerequisite(s): CHE 215 or equivalent.
  
  • CHE 390 - Directed Readings in Chinese

    (2 or 4)
    Directed individual readings in Chinese. May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  • CHE 408 - Advanced Chinese Conversation and Reading

    (4)
    Development of advanced conversational and reading skills. Format will include oral presentations as well as literary and other readings.
    Prerequisite(s): CHE 316 or permission of instructor.

Cinema

  
  • CIN 150 - Introduction to Film

    (4)
    Introduction to the art of film by examination of the filmmaking process, study of narrative and non-narrative film, and exploration of film’s relation to society. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the arts knowledge exploration area. Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity.
  
  • CIN 165 - Introduction to Digital Film Production

    (4)
    Introduction to digital film production through group projects.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 150 or ENG 250; permission of instructor; cinema studies major standing.
  
  • CIN 252 - Methods of Cinema Studies

    (4)
    Introduction to the academic study of film, with special emphasis on scholarly research and formal writing. Film screening lab may be required. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 150 or ENG 250; WRT 160 with a grade of 2.0 or higher.
  
  • CIN 265 - Form and Meaning in Digital Film Production

    (4)
    Through group projects and individual editing, students explore formal methods of creating meaning in shots, sequences and short films.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 165; permission of instructor.
  
  • CIN 300 - History of Film: The Silent Era

    (4)
    Survey of directors and films important in shaping film history: Griffith, Eisenstein, Chaplin, Mumau, Pabst, Lang and others. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 150 or ENG 250.
  
  • CIN 301 - History of Film: The Sound Era to 1958

    (4)
    Examination of significant directors, genres and movements: Welles, Hitchcock, Renoir, DeSica and others; the western, gangster film, musical, neorealism, film noir. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 150 or ENG 250.
  
  • CIN 302 - History of Film: The New Wave and Beyond

    (4)
    Study of film since 1959, including directors such as Godard, Truffaut, Akerman, Fassbinder, Herzog, Wertmuller, Bergman, Altman, Kubrick and Scorsese. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 150 or ENG 250.
  
  • CIN 303 - History of Film: Into the 21st Century

    (4)
    Study of developments in film since the late 1980s, including topics such as Hollywood cinema, independent film-making, experimental films, feminist cinema, national cinema, and new technologies such as digital imaging. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 150 or ENG 250.
  
  • CIN 311 - Studies in Documentary Film

    (4)
    Examination of the history of documentary film-making. Additional focus on aesthetic and industrial practices. Film screening lab may be required.
    Prerequisite(s): CIN 150 or ENG 250.
 

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