Dec 07, 2022  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 The department offers selected courses from this catalog as warranted by student needs and availability of faculty. Specific offerings for each term may be found in the Schedule of Classes.

Course Renumbering Project

Effective the Fall 2017 semester, all undergraduate and graduate courses at Oakland University were renumbered from 3 digits to 4 digits.

Most subject codes will remain the same, but the new four-digit course numbers may in some cases be similar to the previous three-digit course numbers and in other cases be different because academic departments have resequenced their course numbers.

Follow this link to the conversion list.

This searchable PDF is a guide to see how the course numbers have changed. Each row represents a course, and the columns represent: the subject code, the previous three-digit course number,and the new four-digit course number for that course, beginning in Fall 2017.

To search this PDF for a specific course using the old number, you can just hit “Control” (or “Command” if on Mac) and “F,” then type in a specific course (e.g. “WRT 160”) to find the new course number .

The following subject codes have changed:

  • Studio Art (SA) changed to (ART)
  • Some English (ENG) courses changed to Creative Writing (CW)
  • Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) and Computer and Information Technology (CIT) changed to Computer Science and Informatics (CSI)
  • Music Theory and Composition (MUT) changed to either Applied Music (MUA) or Musicology and Music Education (MUS)
  • (MLS) changed to (CDS)
  • Some (JRN) courses changed to (PR)

For more information, please contact your academic adviser. Graduate students, please contact your academic department for advising.

NOTE: If you enrolled or transferred after fall 2014 please be sure to search the 2017-18 catalog courses and review the 3 to 4 digit conversions list.

 

Political Science

  
  •  

    PS 3265 - Gender Discrimination and the Supreme Court

    (4)
    Examines Supreme Court cases throughout history involving gender discrimination. Students will read and discuss case excerpts on issues such as protective legislation, sex discrimination, pregnancy and childbirth, sexual harassment and reproductive rights. Students will also examine the lives and legacies of women justices. Identical with WGS 3817 .
  
  •  

    PS 3305 - Public Administration

    (4)
    Study of government in action, with special attention to policy formulation, organization, personnel administration, supervision, coordination, administrative control and accountability. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): PS 1100 
  
  •  

    PS 3310 - American Public Policy

    (4)
    Examines the factors and actors involved in the development and implementation of public policy. Topics may include environment, education, economic development, defense, health care, welfare policy and ethical analysis of policy. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
  
  •  

    PS 3315 - Public Administration Financial Analysis

    (4)
    Study of accounting and reporting concepts, standards and procedures applicable to city, county, state, and federal governments and non-profit institutions.
  
  •  

    PS 3320 - Public Budgeting

    (4)
    Politics and process of budgeting in public organizations, especially as they relate to the control of policy. Specific techniques are discussed for developing, approving, administering and auditing budgets.
  
  •  

    PS 3325 - Public Sector Human Resource Management

    (4)
    Study of the procedures, techniques and problems of personnel administration in public agencies; evolution of the modern civil service system, merit principle, and responses to collective bargaining and equal opportunity programs.
  
  •  

    PS 3340 - Public Policy and Health Care

    (4)
    Examination of the status and evolution of public policies relating to health and health care, the policy-making processes in health care and the various implications of trends in health care policy.
  
  •  

    PS 3345 - Comparative Public Administration

    (4)
    Comprehensive exploration of the political and policy-making roles of public bureaucracies around the world stressing the effects of politics and organized interests on bureaucracy.
  
  •  

    PS 3405 - Politics of Latin America

    (4)
    Analysis of Latin American political systems and the historical, social and economic factors underlying them. The major countries are studied intensively, and a comparative approach is used to examine the variations from democracy to dictatorship and the political instability that characterizes the area.
  
  •  

    PS 3410 - African Politics

    (4)
    Examination of politics within nations in Africa. Emphasis placed on the evolution of political institutions since independence, along with contemporary challenges of democratization and development. A comparative point of view is emphasized.
  
  •  

    PS 3415 - Politics of the Middle East and North Africa

    (4)
    The cultural and historical factors that influence contemporary politics of the area will be emphasized. Topics include religion, social structures, economic problems, the impact of the West and the Arab-Israeli conflict.
  
  •  

    PS 3420 - European Political Systems

    (4)
    An analysis of politics within and between nations in Europe. Selected institutions and processes are examined in detail. A comparative point of view is emphasized.
  
  •  

    PS 3425 - The Russian Political System

    (4)
    A descriptive analysis of the Russian society as a political system: its origins, institutions and political behavior. Trends and developments in the system will be assessed, and comparisons with other political systems will be undertaken. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
  
  •  

    PS 3430 - Political Systems of Asia

    (4)
    Elements of political life in China, Japan, India, and other Asian countries. Cultural, historical, social, and economic factors that influence and are influenced by contemporary political institutions Processes by which political conflicts are resolved.
  
  •  

    PS 3435 - Chinese Politics and Foreign Policy

    (4)
    Examination of the political system and policies of contemporary China, covering the rise of communism in China, reforms to the communist system, political institutions, political culture, and foreign policy.
  
  •  

    PS 3550 - Politics of Development

    (4)
    Examination of the issues that relate to social, political and economic development in countries undergoing dramatic social change.
  
  •  

    PS 3555 - Global Democratization

    (4)
    Examination of movement toward democratic forms of government in various parts of the world and of those factors that promote or inhibit democracy.
  
  •  

    PS 3560 - Revolution, Intervention, and Democratization

    (4)
    Examination of revolution and counterrevolution as products of U.S. efforts to fashion and preserve a liberal international order involving systematic interference in the affairs of sovereign countries. Focus is on the motivations, methods, and consequences of official and sponsored intervention on a global scale. “Democracy promotion” is afforded special consideration.
  
  •  

    PS 3565 - Dictatorships

    (4)
    Contemporary dictatorships, why they emerge, how they function, and the various strategies that may lead to their collapse.
  
  •  

    PS 3605 - Model United Nations

    (2 OR 4)
    Examination of the United Nations (UN) system and issues currently confronting UN bodies. Includes participation in regional or national Model UN conference. May be repeated once for PS or IR credit and up to two additional times for elective credit toward the degree.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of department.
  
  •  

    PS 3610 - United States Foreign Policy

    (4)
    Examination of American foreign policy process, focusing on the impact of domestic societal, political and bureaucratic determinants of foreign policy and the constraints imposed by the international system. Main instruments of foreign policy, for instance, diplomacy, military power, economic statecraft, overt action, are considered and evaluated.
  
  •  

    PS 3615 - Comparative Foreign Policy

    (4)
    An examination of the major theoretical debates in the field of foreign policy analysis, with a focus on the relative impact of domestic and international factors on the decision-making process and the behavior of states. Theoretical matters will be explored in the comparative analysis of the foreign policy of global and regional powers in the international system.
  
  •  

    PS 3630 - International Organizations

    (4)
    Examination of major international organizations such as the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, the European Union, and regional organizations. Explanation of how these organizations fit into international relations theory and how they affect world politics today.
  
  •  

    PS 3640 - International Political Economy

    (4)
    Examination of the relationship between political and economic structure, organization, and events, including issues such as the politics of trade and investment, regional integration, behavior of multinational corporations, and economic development.
  
  •  

    PS 3650 - Globalization and International Economic Institutions

    (4)
    Broad survey of contemporary political debates on globalization, including trade and jobs, investment and labor rights, poverty, inequality and economic development, and pro- and anti-globalization movement. Special attention will be given to how governments and international organizations, such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, the World Trade organization and their regional counterparts, operate.
  
  •  

    PS 3660 - International Law

    (4)
    Explores the sources, foundations, and principles of public and other forms of international law. Emphasis on institutions and processes of international dispute resolution, issues of jurisdiction, state sovereignty, and responsibility, and distinctive bodies of international law concerning human rights, individual criminal acts, preservation and protection of the environment, and the use of military force.
  
  •  

    PS 3710 - International Politics of Human Rights

    (4)
    Development of international human rights norms, the central debates and controversies: their application and enforcement in international politics. Focus on the evolution of the definition of human rights and its affect on the emerging international human rights regime.
  
  •  

    PS 3715 - Gender and Int’l Relations

    (4)
    Examination of major gender critiques of mainstream IR theory and the ways in which gender analysis expands both theory and practical political analysis at the international and global levels. Identical with WGS 3823 .
  
  •  

    PS 3720 - The Politics of Migration

    (4)
    The political consequences of migration. Similarities and differences of migration dynamics around the world are explored, as are different theoretical understandings of the causes of migration, the sources of inter-group conflict and how policies can help ameliorate or exacerbate such conflict. Special attention will be paid to the relationship between migration and democracy through scholarly articles drawn from political science research.
  
  •  

    PS 3730 - Global Environmental Governance

    (4)
    Overview of inter-related environmental and resource issues at the regional and global levels. Current institutions, laws and policies for addressing issues including global warming, climate change, biodiversity/species decline, trade/environment linkages, water resources, depletion of global fisheries and rainforests. Identical with ENV 3540 . Satisfies the university general education requirement in the knowledge applications integration area. Prerequisite for knowledge applications integration: completion of the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
  
  •  

    PS 3750 - International Conflict and Security

    (4)
    Examination of the conditions that make for war and peace in world politics, and of the range of possible approaches that might help to manage or prevent conflict in the future. Factors contributing to conflict within and between states are considered.
  
  •  

    PS 3755 - International Negotiation and Bargaining

    (4)
    Negotiation theories and practice, focusing on understanding differing approaches to negotiation and explaining bargaining outcomes. Emphasis on hands-on learning through simulation, role-playing exercises, and case analysis.
  
  •  

    PS 3780 - International Terrorism: Causes, Consequences, Responses

    (4)
    Exploration of terrorist motivation and ideology, methods, and the effectiveness of international and state-level responses to terrorist challengers.
  
  •  

    PS 3810 - Conducting Political Surveys

    (4)
    Overview of the history and approaches to survey research. Students will gain experience in planning and implementing survey projects and interpreting responses.
  
  •  

    PS 3850 - Geographic Information System Analysis for Sustainability

    (4)
    Examines environmental sustainability through GIS (Geographic Information System) mapping and analysis. Sustainability topics are covered through computer lab exercises and policy case studies. Prepares students to conduct GIS analysis and evaluate the sustainability implications of public policies. Identical with ENV 4520 .
  
  •  

    PS 3930 - Special Topics in American Politics

    (2 OR 4)
    From time to time, the department offers courses on special topics in response to current issues in various subfields of the discipline.
  
  •  

    PS 3940 - Special Topics in Comparative Politics and International Relations

    (1 TO 4)
    From time to time the department offers courses on special topics in response to current issues in various subfields of the discipline. May be repeated under different subtitle.
  
  •  

    PS 3996 - Independent Study

    (2 OR 4)
    Readings not normally covered in existing course offerings. Directed on an individual basis.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of department and instructor.
  
  •  

    PS 4030 - Government and the Economy

    (4)
    Role of government in the economy, including an examination of federal, local, and international fiscal and monetary policies.
  
  •  

    PS 4950 - Public Administration Internship

    (4)
    Supervised student internship with governmental, political, criminal justice or other public agency. Reports and analyses of work performed at agency required. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): PS 2800  and PS 3305 , junior standing and permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PS 4955 - Political Science/International Relations Internship

    (4)
    Supervised student internship with governmental, political, criminal justice, or other public agency. Reports and analyses of work performed at agency required. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of internship director.
  
  •  

    PS 4970 - Seminar in American Politics

    (4)
    Advanced seminar in a special topic related to American politics. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): PS 1100  and PS 2550  and permission of major adviser.
  
  •  

    PS 4975 - Seminar in the Comparative Study of Political Systems

    (4)
    Advanced seminar in a special topic related to comparative politics. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): PS 1400  and PS 2550  and permission of major adviser.
  
  •  

    PS 4980 - Seminar in International Relations

    (4)
    Advanced seminar in a special topic related to international relations. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): PS 1600 , PS 2550  and PS 3040  and permission of major adviser.
  
  •  

    PS 4995 - Special Topics or Directed Research

    (2 TO 8)
    Prerequisite(s): permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    PS 4997 - College Teaching Apprenticeship

    (4)
    Affords the opportunity for qualified students to deepen their understanding of selected topics in political science and ways of teaching politics by assisting an instructor in teaching a 1000 level political science course and writing a critique of this experience. May be taken only once for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and department chair.

Production and Operations Management

  
  •  

    POM 3000 - Survey of Operations Management

    (3)
    This course introduces the student to the operation of both manufacturing and service organizations. Topics included are capacity planning, facility location and layout, production control and scheduling and quality assurance. Business majors, pre-business students and business undecided students cannot take this course. Offered every other winter semester.
    Prerequisite(s): junior standing.
  
  •  

    POM 3430 - Operations Management

    (4)
    Study of operations of manufacturing and service organizations. Introduction to operational design and control issues such as forecasting, capacity planning, facility location and layout, production control, material requirements planning, scheduling and quality assurance. Includes international, legal and ethical aspects.
    Prerequisite(s): QMM 2400  or QMM 2410  or QMM 2500  or STA 2226  or STA 2220  and ACC 2100  with a minimum grade of (C) in each course.
  
  •  

    POM 3990 - ACHIEVE III - Operations Management

    (0)
    Guide students through the job search process within the Operations Management major.
    Prerequisite(s): major standing and SBC 1990  and SBC 2990  
  
  •  

    POM 4350 - Management of Service Operations

    (3)
    This course seeks to improve the student’s understanding of the nature of organizations that produce services in addition to, and instead of, goods. It explores some of the operating and other management issues, problems, and decisions found in such organizations. The course takes a general management viewpoint with a bias towards operations, marketing, and human resource management. It establishes a framework for the evaluation of existing and new service concepts and examines similarities and differences between management in the service and manufacturing sectors. It exposes students to important service concepts and practices and makes us aware of problems, issues, and opportunities in the service sector.
    Prerequisite(s): POM 3430  with a minimum grade of (C).
  
  •  

    POM 4400 - Process Management

    (3)
    This course examines the management of business processes in order to attain objectives including productivity enhancement, cost reduction and quality improvements. Organizational efforts to continuously improve processes and enhance customer satisfaction are examined with a primary focus on the complementary subjects of Lean and Total Quality Management (TQM). Special topics such as leadership styles: costs of quality; employee empowerment, participation, and teamwork; statistical process control tools; process improvement techniques; product design; variance reduction; value and non-value adding activities; waste eliminating; and numerous lean practices and tools will be examined.
    Prerequisite(s): POM 3430  with a minimum grade of (C).
  
  •  

    POM 4410 - Operations Analytics

    (3)
    This course focuses on modeling and analyzing business operations using computer simulation including discrete event, Monte-Carlo, and systems dynamics. Topics include simulation modeling, input and output analysis, and managing simulation projects. The course includes hands-on work related to application of computer simulation modeling in the context of managerial decision making under uncertainty and designing business processes. Cross-listed with MIS 4410 .
    Prerequisite(s): QMM 2410  and POM 3430  with a minimum grade of (C) in each course.
  
  •  

    POM 4420 - Supply Chain Management

    (3)
    This course will examine several issues on effective management of today’s supply chains. They include planning and design for supply chains, mass customization and postponement, distribution networks, management of supplier relationships, benefits/challenges of global sourcing, management of supply chain risks, integration and evaluation of supply chains.
    Prerequisite(s): POM 3430  with a minimum grade of (C)
  
  •  

    POM 4430 - Operations Planning and Control

    (3)
    Studies the economic conversion of inputs into goods and services for both manufacturing and service organizations. Managerial and technical aspects of planning and controlling resources within a transformation system are examined including demand management, lean manufacturing, master production scheduling, materials requirements planning, capacity planning and inventory control.
    Prerequisite(s): POM 3430  with a minimum grade of (C)
  
  •  

    POM 4480 - Project Management

    (3)
    Project management topics examined will include: project selection, project plan elements including statements of work, scope statements, budgets, alternative organizational structures, work breakdown structures, the role of the project manager, leadership styles, teamwork approaches, conflict resolution, schedule development and risk management. Project monitoring and control and project termination will be investigated as well.
    Prerequisite(s): POM 3430  with a minimum grade of (C).
  
  •  

    POM 4500 - Operations Strategy

    (3)
    This capstone course examines the formulation and implementation of an operations strategy as part of overall business strategy. It will examine managing operations of competitive advantage (cost, quality, speed, and flexibility) in service and manufacturing firms. Cases are used to illustrate various concepts. Only offered winter terms.
    Prerequisite(s): POM 3430  and POM 4430  and POM 4350  or POM 4400  or POM 4420  or POM 4480  or QMM 4400  with a minimum grade of (C) in each course and major standing.
  
  •  

    POM 4900 - Special Topics in Operations Management

    (3)
    Intensive study of a selected topic in production/operations management. Topics vary. See Schedule of Classes for current offering. May be repeated for a total of six credits as long as the topic is different.
    Prerequisite(s): POM 3430  with a minimum grade of (C)
  
  •  

    POM 4996 - Independent Study

    (1 TO 4)
    Qualified and highly motivated students may engage in individual research, directed readings or group study under the supervision of a faculty member. Offered every term. May be repeated for a total of eight credits.
    Prerequisite(s): overall (3.0) GPA and approved contract.

Psychology

  
  •  

    PSY 1000 - Introduction to Psychology

    (4)
    An introduction both to basic principles and recent formulations in psychology. Topics include the central psychological processes of attending, perceiving, learning, thinking, remembering and study of social behavior, and the development and organization of personality. Required of psychology majors. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area.
  
  •  

    PSY 2150 - Introduction to Biological and Cognitive Psychology

    (4)
    Survey of the processes of learning, memory and thinking, including physiological factors underlying these processes.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 2250 - Introduction to Life-Span Developmental Psychology

    (4)
    Survey of the principal cognitive, social and behavioral processes that operate across the life-span. Satisfies the university general education requirement for knowledge applications integration. Prerequisite for knowledge applications integration: completion of the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 2350 - Introduction to Social Psychology

    (4)
    Overview of traditional and current trends in social psychology. Attention is given to developing theoretical approaches to attitudes, interpersonal processes and social perception.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 2360 - Introduction to Individual Differences and Personality Psychology

    (4)
    Survey of basic research in individual differences and personality, including a discussion of major personality theories, personality variables (i.e., aggression, altruism) and the measurement of personality variables.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 2400 - Introduction to Positive Psychology

    (4)
    Scientific study of the strengths and virtues that allow individuals and communities to thrive. Review of empirical and theoretical work as it relates to positive emotions such as contentment, happiness, hope; individual traits such as optimism, self-efficacy, compassion, resilience, integrity, hope, wisdom; and institutional strengths that foster justice, parenting, leadership, purpose and tolerance.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 2410 - Introduction to Clinical Psychology

    (4)
    Introduction to the broad field of clinical psychology. The various roles of a clinical psychologist and sub-fields of study in clinical psychology will be covered. Detailed attention will be given to the history and current directions of the field and the activities of a clinical psychologist, including assessment, prevention, intervention, research and consultation.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 2500 - Research Design in Psychology

    (4)
    General introduction to design, function and interpretation of research in the social sciences. Provides necessary preparation to evaluate the empirically based content of psychology. Required of psychology majors.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 2510 - Statistics in Psychology

    (4)
    Introduces principal statistical procedures needed to analyze and interpret data in behavioral science research. Includes descriptive and inferential statistics.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher and proficiency in intermediate algebra as demonstrated through a grade of (C) or higher in MTH 0662  or placement in a higher mathematics course.
  
  •  

    PSY 2900 - Topics in Psychology

    (1 TO 4)
    Offered occasionally on special topics of current interest that are not listed among regular offerings.
    Prerequisite(s): see individual listings in the Schedule of Classes.
  
  •  

    PSY 3010 - The Psychology of Human Sexuality

    (4)
    Current knowledge surrounding the psychology of human sexual behavior, orientations, and experience. General topics include anatomy, reproduction, sexual behavior, theories of sexual orientation, paraphilia, and sexual health. Students will achieve a current understanding of human sexuality from a psychological perspective.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3020 - Evolution, Science, and Superstition

    (4)
    Overview of the methods and products of science as contrasted with superstition and supernaturalism, with a focus on the evolved psychology that motivates scientific and supernatural thinking. Focus on differentiating critical thinking and scientific evidence-based beliefs and practices from beliefs and practices that are not evidence-based and do not depend on critical thinking, such as tarot card readings, palm readings, astrology and supernaturalism.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3030 - Evolutionary Psychology

    (4)
    Reviews empirical and theoretical work in the broad field of evolutionary psychology which addresses human and non-human nature, individual differences and group differences, including sex differences and cultural differences from an evolutionary perspective.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3040 - Animal Behavior

    (4)
    Comparative psychological, ethological and sociobiological viewpoints behavior of animals. Emphasis on vertebrate species including humans. Discussion of reproductive, aggressive and social behaviors, learning, communication, etc. Stresses an evolutionary perspective. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3100 - Creativity and Innovation

    (4)
    Interdisciplinary approach to understanding cultural, societal, individual, cognitive, and biological determinants of creativity and their application to innovation.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3110 - Sensation and Perception

    (4)
    Psychophysical, physiological and cognitive approaches to the basic sensory systems and perceptual processes.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3160 - Cognitive Psychology

    (4)
    The information processing approach to problems in pattern recognition, selective attention, mental operations, short- and long-term memory, the psychology of reading, problem solving and probabilistic reasoning. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3180 - Biological Psychology

    (4)
    Biological bases of behavior of humans and related mammalian species: basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, motivation, emotion, learning and memory, sleep and dreams, sensory-motor mechanisms, brain stimulation, psychopharmacology, hormones and behavior. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3210 - Child Development

    (4)
    Theory and principles of child development from birth to puberty. Selected topics include: maturational processes, learning and motivation, intelligence, self concept and child-rearing practices. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3220 - Adolescence and Youth

    (4)
    Focuses on the scientific study of the normative biological, cognitive, emotional, personality and social changes that occur during adolescence. Selected topics include pubertal maturation, information processing, identity development, peer relations and family dynamics. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3230 - Adulthood and Aging

    (4)
    Psychological change, from young adulthood to death. Topics include potentials for psychological growth and sources of crisis, changes in intellectual processes, attitudes toward aging, retirement and the needs of the aged. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3300 - Social Cognition

    (4)
    The theory and research explicating thinking processes underlying social phenomena such as impression formation, persuasion, conformity, compliance, stereotyping and causal perception. Areas of focus include attitude formation and change, attribution theory, the role of affect in cognition, schema theory and theories of nonverbal behavior. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3330 - Motivation

    (4)
    Principal theories of motivation. Examination of needs, cognition, and social aspects. Includes a critical review of research and application of these theories to behavior. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3340 - Industrial and Organizational Psychology

    (4)
    Scientific study of the workplace including the application of psychological research methods to such critical business issues as talent management, training and development, selection processes, performance assessment, job satisfaction, employee motivation and commitment, organization development, and work-life balance. The scientist-practitioner model will be emphasized.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3370 - Group Dynamics

    (4)
    Group structure, function and process. Focus on how individuals affect the behavior of people in groups; how the group, in turn, affects the behavior of the individual. Topics include leadership, cohesion, group therapy, crowds and mobs.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3390 - Emotion

    (4)
    Understanding of human emotion from both an historical and theoretical viewpoint. Contemporary theoretical positions will be compared in terms of the roles cognition, behavior and psychological changes play in the emotional experience. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3410 - Adult Psychopathology

    (4)
    Introduction to psychopathology across the lifespan with a focus on the etiology from psychological, biological and sociocultural perspectives; assessment; diagnosis; and empirically-based treatment options. Includes scientific discussion of clinical types, methods of investigation and principals of psychotherapy.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3430 - Child Psychopathology

    (4)
    The psychopathology of children and adolescents. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3440 - Behavior Analysis

    (4)
    Theory and research on the analysis of behavior as it has developed from Pavlov to Skinner and Bandura. Includes a consideration of the application of principles of behavior analysis to individual and social behavior. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3450 - Health Psychology

    (4)
    Application of psychological theory and research to health promotion as well as illness prevention and treatment. The interaction between biological, social and psychological factors in health and medical problems is emphasized. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3460 - Psychology of Gender

    (4)
    Exploration of the psychological perspectives on sex and gender, gender identity, roles, conflicts and stereotypes. Emphasis on psychological development and socialization, race, culture, social class and sexuality. May highlight the unique experiences of women. Identical with WGS 3824 .
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1000  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 3500 - Introduction to Psychometrics

    (4)
    Critical examination of test construction methods and interpretation of various tests, including intelligence, achievement, interests, and personality. Psychological tests and testing in applied settings, with special attention on issues around reliability and validity. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in general education or the major, not both. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2510  with a grade of (C) or higher.
  
  •  

    PSY 4500 - Advanced Research Design in Psychology

    (4)
    Issues in design and methodology of psychological research with application to one of the areas in psychology. Independent research project required. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2510  with a grade of (C) or higher and permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PSY 4510 - Advanced Statistics in Psychology

    (4)
    Advanced statistical procedures employed in social science research. Topics include testing the statistical assumptions and a variety of inferential statistics such as partial correlations, multiple regression analysis, factor analysis, mixed ANOVA, and non-parametric tests. Emphasizes the integration of methodological, computational, and statistical issues using statistical software.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2510  with a grade of (C) or higher and permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PSY 4921 - Readings and Research Projects

    (4)
    Individual readings or laboratory research on a topic agreed upon by a student and a member of the psychology faculty. May be repeated for additional credit. Not more than 8 credits of readings and research project may be counted toward fulfillment of the major in psychology. Each satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
  
  •  

    PSY 4930 - Field Experience in Psychology

    (4)
    The application of psychological concepts and methods in a non-academic setting. Includes job placement with a classroom component, readings and discussion of relevant literature. May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): junior/senior standing. Minimum of 16 credits in the major including PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher, two courses between PSY 3100  and PSY 3460  and permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PSY 4971 - Seminar in Cognition, Perception, and Biological Psychology

    (4)
    Advanced seminar in a special topic related to cognition, perception, conditioning or physiological processes. May be repeated once for a total of 8 credits. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PSY 4972 - Seminar in Developmental Psychology

    (4)
    Advanced seminar in a special topic related to developmental psychology, such as theories of development. May be repeated once for a total of 8 credits. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PSY 4973 - Seminar in Social Psychology

    (4)
    Advanced seminar in a special topic related to social psychology, such as attitudes, attributions or theories of social influence. May be repeated once for a total of 8 credits. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PSY 4974 - Seminar in Individual Differences and Personality Psychology

    (4)
    Advanced seminar in a special topic related to individual differences and personality psychology, such as theories of personality, aggression or religion. May be repeated once for a total of 8 credits. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2500  with a grade of (C) or higher, and permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PSY 4977 - Seminar: Psychopharmacology

    (4)
    Examines the effects of drugs on brain and behavior. Includes introduction to brain anatomy and neurotransmission. Emphasis on explanation and theories for the effects of drugs of abuse and drug treatments for psychological disorders on the brain and behavior. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 3180  with a grade of (C) or higher or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PSY 4978 - Seminar: Cognitive Development in Children

    (4)
    Advanced seminar that examines children’s cognitive development from infancy through early adolescence. Includes topics such as information processing theories, spatial cognition, schooling and cognition and the study of intelligence. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 2250 , PSY 2500  and PSY 3210 , each with a grade of (C) or higher, or permission of instructor.
 

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