Dec 03, 2022  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 The department offers selected courses from this catalog as warranted by student needs and availability of faculty. Specific offerings for each term may be found in the Schedule of Classes.

Course Renumbering Project

Effective the Fall 2017 semester, all undergraduate and graduate courses at Oakland University were renumbered from 3 digits to 4 digits.

Most subject codes will remain the same, but the new four-digit course numbers may in some cases be similar to the previous three-digit course numbers and in other cases be different because academic departments have resequenced their course numbers.

Follow this link to the conversion list.

This searchable PDF is a guide to see how the course numbers have changed. Each row represents a course, and the columns represent: the subject code, the previous three-digit course number,and the new four-digit course number for that course, beginning in Fall 2017.

To search this PDF for a specific course using the old number, you can just hit “Control” (or “Command” if on Mac) and “F,” then type in a specific course (e.g. “WRT 160”) to find the new course number .

The following subject codes have changed:

  • Studio Art (SA) changed to (ART)
  • Some English (ENG) courses changed to Creative Writing (CW)
  • Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) and Computer and Information Technology (CIT) changed to Computer Science and Informatics (CSI)
  • Music Theory and Composition (MUT) changed to either Applied Music (MUA) or Musicology and Music Education (MUS)
  • (MLS) changed to (CDS)
  • Some (JRN) courses changed to (PR)

For more information, please contact your academic adviser. Graduate students, please contact your academic department for advising.

NOTE: If you enrolled or transferred after fall 2014 please be sure to search the 2017-18 catalog courses and review the 3 to 4 digit conversions list.

 

Secondary Education

  
  •  

    SED 4910 - International Experiences in a Foreign Country

    (1)
    Through directed study in international settings, students will develop first-hand awareness of cultural diversity. They will explore ways of creating or enriching existing curricular materials with their new-found understandings of comparative perspectives at a global level. Cross listed with EED 4910 .
  
  •  

    SED 4951 - Internship I: Pre-Student Teaching

    (4)
    Provides an academic year internship in an assigned school district under the guidance of a clinical instructor and university instructor. Grade of (B) is required for certification recommendation.
    Prerequisite(s): admission to the internship.
  
  •  

    SED 4952 - Internship in Secondary Education

    (4 TO 12)
    Provides an academic year internship in an assigned school district under the guidance of a clinical instructor and university instructor. Enrollment for a total of 12 credits is required for completion of the internship. Grade of (B) or above required for certification recommendation. May not be repeated. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience.
    Prerequisite(s): admission to the internship.
  
  •  

    SED 4996 - Independent Study in Secondary Education

    (1 TO 4)
    Pursues directed individual reading, research and fieldwork in secondary education. May be repeated for a total of four credits.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of department (or written consent by faculty who will supervise study).

Social Work

  
  •  

    SW 2301 - Introduction to Social Work

    (4)
    Study of the social work profession and the social context of welfare policies; the relationships between social structure and the development of social work practice; and public and private welfare organizations.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or PSY 1000 
  
  •  

    SW 3101 - Human Behavior and Social Environment

    (4)
    Theories of human behavior and social environment. Examines biological, psychological, social, spiritual development in humans from birth to adolescence. Social systems theory is applied to analyze interactions between human behavior and social institutions. Explores role of culture, race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation in human development and behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): formal admission to social work program.
  
  •  

    SW 3102 - Foundations for Multicultural Social Work

    (4)
    Prepares students to work with multicultural and diverse populations. Emphasis on defining and developing skills for culturally competent social work generalist practice.
    Prerequisite(s): formal acceptance into the social work program.
  
  •  

    SW 3112 - Substance Abuse Theory and Practice I

    (4)
    Comprehensive overview of the etiology of addiction and introduction to theoretical approaches used in prevention, intervention, and treatment. Examines the psychological, historical, cultural, social, biological, and medical perspectives of substance abuse and addiction.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or PSY 1000  or CRJ 1100  or SW 2301 
  
  •  

    SW 3201 - Human Behavior and Social Environment

    (4)
    Presents theories of human behavior and social environment. Examines biological, psychological, social, spiritual development in humans from early to late adulthood. Social systems theory is applied to analyze interactions between human behavior and social institutions. Explores role of culture, race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation in human development and behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): SW 3101  
  
  •  

    SW 3203 - Fundamentals of Social Work Practice

    (4)
    Fundamental social work methods including documentation, listening skills, interviewing skills, relationship building, boundary setting and case management. Completion of a service learning requirement in preparation for internship.
    Prerequisite(s): formal acceptance into the social work program.
  
  •  

    SW 3212 - Substance Abuse Theory and Practice II

    (4)
    Continuation of SW 3112 . Theoretical approaches to counseling and its practical applications in a variety of settings. Evidence-based treatments and different levels of counseling. Values, ethical and legal considerations, and professional organizations.
    Prerequisite(s): SW 3112 
  
  •  

    SW 3302 - Social Welfare Policies

    (4)
    Survey of the development of social welfare programs in the U.S. and internationally. Issues related to the problems of poverty, policy analysis and program evaluation related to social welfare in the U.S. and other countries are examined. Identical with SOC 3220 . Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SW 2301 
  
  •  

    SW 3312 - Death and Dying

    (4)
    Interdisciplinary exploration of death and dying, focusing primarily on psychosocial, mental health, behavioral, and ethical issues.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or PSY 1000  or SW 2301 
  
  •  

    SW 3313 - Child Welfare

    (4)
    Examination of the field of child welfare in a theoretical and practice perspective, exploring the nature of at-risk families and the role of social work services for abused and neglected children; current issues in child welfare and interventions as they relate to social work in child welfare settings.
    Prerequisite(s): social work major.
  
  •  

    SW 3905 - Special Topics in Social Work

    (2 TO 4)
    Special topic for which no course offerings currently exist. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.
    Prerequisite(s): social work major or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    SW 4103 - Social Work Practice I

    (4)
    Prepares students for generalist social work practice involving individuals, families, other groups. Emphasizes how to engage clients, assess needs, provide intervention, terminate intervention, evaluate outcomes. Provides conceptual framework for practicing social work in diverse settings; prepares students with skills for field placement; presents students values, ethical standards of the profession.
    Prerequisite(s): SW 3203 
    Corequisite(s): SW 4950 , SW 4970 
  
  •  

    SW 4203 - Social Work Practice II

    (4)
    Prepares students for generalist social work practice involving task groups, organizations, communities. Focus on critical thinking about clients in context of larger environment; analyzing relevant interactions within groups, organizations, communities; analyzing operation of groups from political, economic, social perspectives. Examines issues of discrimination, social justice, institutional racism.
    Prerequisite(s): SW 4103 
    Corequisite(s): SW 4951 , SW 4971 
  
  •  

    SW 4950 - Social Work Internship I

    (2)
    Field placement in social service agency in which students are supervised by professional social workers. Students learn how to handle process notes, develop interviewing skills, investigate community resources, and interpret agency policies.
    Prerequisite(s): SW 3203 
    Corequisite(s): SW 4103 , SW 4970 
  
  •  

    SW 4951 - Social Work Internship II

    (2)
    Second field placement in a social service agency in which students are supervised by professional social workers. Students learn how to handle process notes, develop interviewing skills, investigate community resources, and interpret agency policies.
    Prerequisite(s): SW 4103 , SW 4950  and SW 4970 
    Corequisite(s): SW 4203 , SW 4971 
  
  •  

    SW 4970 - Social Work Seminar I

    (4)
    Students present and analyze field experiences to develop capacity for self-awareness; development and appropriate application of social work knowledge, values, skills. Review of helping process, generalist practice, theoretical foundations. Prepares students to work with diverse and at-risk clients. Lays foundation for continuing professional development. Weekly seminar accompanies first-semester internship.
    Prerequisite(s): SW 3203 
    Corequisite(s): SW 4103 , SW 4950 
  
  •  

    SW 4971 - Social Work Seminar II

    (4)
    Weekly seminar held in conjunction with second semester of the social work internship. Students analyze field experiences to further enhance self-awareness, and the development and appropriate application of social work knowledge, values and skills in practice. Capstone course in which students complete a major integrative paper and portfolio. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): SW 4103 , SW 4950  and SW 4970 
    Corequisite(s): SW 4203  and SW 4951 
  
  •  

    SW 4996 - Independent Study and Research

    (2 OR 4)
    In-depth study of a topic under the guidance of a faculty supervisor or participation in faculty member research. May be repeated for up to four credits.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

Sociology

  
  •  

    CRJ 1100 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

    (4)
    Introduction to the study of crime and criminal justice in the United States. Provides an overview of crime statistics, types of offenses, police roles, courts and correctional agencies, and public policy. Includes a comparison of street crime with white-collar crime. Required for all majors and minors in criminal justice.
  
  •  

    CRJ 2100 - Criminological Theory

    (4)
    Provides foundational knowledge about criminological theory essential for success in more advanced criminal justice courses. Topics include the origins of criminology in the U.S. and both classical and contemporary criminological theoretical approaches to the study of crime, crime causation, and crime control strategies.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3223 - Delinquency and Juvenile Justice

    (4)
    Overview of the nature and types of delinquency, its relation to adolescence and the social situation, processing by the juvenile justice system. Examines juvenile court procedures, detention facilities, adjudication issues, life without parole sentences, delinquency prevention, treatment programs. Identical with SOC 3240 .
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 2100  or SOC 1000 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3224 - Corrections and Rehabilitative Institutions

    (4)
    Overview of prison and correctional systems in the U.S. Includes reviews of the historical development and current issues in corrections, including sentencing practices, overcrowding, race relations, budget constraints, substance abuse. Explores ways in which these problems are addressed by criminal justice practitioners. Identical with SOC 3840 .
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 2100  
  
  •  

    CRJ 3227 - Police and Society

    (4)
    Examines the history and role of the police in modern society. Special attention given to analyzing the police subculture and problems inherent in the control of the citizenry and police, handling special populations, the police as a quasi-militaristic bureaucracy, surveillance techniques on the police organization and issues of police deviance. Identical with SOC 3450 .
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 2100  or SOC 1000 .
  
  •  

    CRJ 3229 - Criminal Law and the Courts

    (4)
    Overview of the criminal law and sentencing within the U.S. criminal justice system. Focuses on criminal law and procedures as it relates to the processing of criminal offenders by the courts. The roles of judges, court officers, jury and attorneys are described and analyzed in the context of their professional matrix. Identical with SOC 3850 .
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 2100  or SOC 1000 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3300 - Alcohol, Drugs and Society

    (4)
    Overview of the sociology of substance use and abuse. Reviews sociological perspectives, social control of alcohol and drugs, descriptions of alcohol/drug behavior and treatment programs. Explores how substance abuse problems can be addressed by policy makers, lawmakers, health care professionals, and criminal justice officials. Identical with SOC 3230 .
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100  or SOC 1000 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3320 - Criminology and Public Policy in Criminal Justice

    (4)
    Overview of problems conducting research and policy evaluation in criminal justice agencies, including history of policy research and deterrence, rehabilitation, gun control, sex offenders, drug use/prevention, sentencing practices, mass incarceration, community based-corrections and democratic policing.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 2100 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3330 - Women, Crime and Justice

    (4)
    Exploration of various issues related to women’s experiences with the criminal justice system as offenders, victims, and practitioners. Uses feminist criminological scholarship to examine: the historical place of women in the study of crime, explanations of men’s and women’s offending, the relationship between women’s victimization and offending behaviors, and the role of women in traditionally male-dominated criminal justice careers. Identical with WGS 3812 .
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100  or WGS 1000 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3332 - Race/Ethnicity, Crime and Justice

    (4)
    Socio-historical analysis of the effects of race and ethnicity on legitimate social opportunities, criminal behavior, victimization, and differential judicial processing. Analysis of the impact of assimilation and acculturation on criminal behavior, victimization, and criminal justice processes.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3340 - White-Collar Crime

    (4)
    Overview of white-collar crime and deviance, corporate and organizational crime, and political crimes both by and against the state.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100  
  
  •  

    CRJ 3341 - Cybercrime

    (4)
    Overview of cybercrime from a criminal justice perspective. Examines types of computer and cybercrimes, the hacker subculture, cybercrime prevention, information security and investigative methodologies, and the legal and social issues (e.g., jurisdiction, privacy) inherent in detection and control.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3342 - The Surveillance Society

    (4)
    Explores the development and significance of surveillance as a feature of modern society, how surveillance has changed over time with the development of new technologies, its presence in everyday life and different social institutions and contexts and the degree to which surveillance enhances social participation or social control in society. Identical with SOC 3860 .
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100  or SOC 1000 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3346 - Profiling and Threat Assessment

    (4)
    Critical examination of criminal profiling including crime scene, psychological, and offender profiling. Discusses ethnic, racial, and behavioral profiling, equivocal death analysis and the geographical profiling of serial killers and rapists. Reviews threat assessment models as applied to school shooters, stalking behavior and terrorists with emphasis on the empirical validity of intelligence analysis.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 2100 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3347 - Neighborhoods, Schools and Crime

    (4)
    Detailed exploration of criminological and sociological theories and research on the importance of neighborhood and school settings for crime and victimization. Ways in which social and structural contexts are associated with crime, delinquent behavior, and victimization.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3348 - Terrorism and Homeland Security

    (4)
    Examines the threat of terrorism within U.S. borders, countermeasures employed to protect critical infrastructures and the key resources of homeland security. Critically reviews the effectiveness of anti-terror and counter-terror strategy and tactics.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 2100 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3349 - Applied Intelligence

    (4)
    Applications of basic elements of intelligence: collection, analysis, dissemination, counterintelligence, and covert methods.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100  
  
  •  

    CRJ 3350 - Introduction to Security

    (4)
    Basic principles and concepts used by security professionals including understanding how security organizations are structured, where the security organization is placed within private industry, legal aspects, threat assessments, architectural design for security, physical and electronic security methodologies, corporate espionage, and intellectual property security.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100  
  
  •  

    CRJ 3351 - Geography of Crime

    (4)
    Examines the structural and social determinants of crime across geographic places and considers the spatial distribution of crime and victimization.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3360 - Crime and the Life Course

    (4)
    Overview of types of juvenile and adult criminal careers. Examines patterns of offending and desistance across the life course, and the individual, cultural, and structural factors that influence motivations and opportunities for both offending and desistance.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 2100 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3365 - Critical Incident Analysis

    (4)
    Analysis of critical incidents: relatively brief and usually traumatic occurrences involving injury, loss, conflict, discovery or change of significant proportion with the potential to alter existing societal norms or threaten the bonds of trust that bind communities. Examines the types of incidents (natural events, human error/accidents, intentional acts/terrorism), and the responses at the local, state, and national levels to understand similarities and differences among incidents.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100 
  
  •  

    CRJ 3905 - Special Topics in Criminal Justice

    (4)
    Study of a special topic for which no regular course offerings currently exist. May be repeated for credit under a different subtitle.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100 , criminal justice major or minor or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    CRJ 4950 - Internship in Criminal Justice

    (4)
    Field placement and supervision of students in an approved criminal justice agency requiring the completion of associated course work to receive academic credit. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): all required and core classes for the major and approval of director of field placement.
  
  •  

    CRJ 4970 - Capstone: Criminal Justice Policy Analysis

    (4)
    Capstone seminar in which students demonstrate the ability to link theoretical knowledge and empirical evidence about a key criminal justice question to inform and improve public policy. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 2100  and CRJ 4950 , and senior standing.
  
  •  

    CRJ 4996 - Independent Study and Research

    (2 OR 4)
    Directed individual reading and research.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    CRJ 4997 - College Teaching Apprenticeship

    (2 OR 4)
    Supervised participation in teaching an undergraduate course in criminal justice combined with readings and discussion of teaching objectives and methods appropriate for presentation of criminal justice curriculum. May be taken only once for credit toward a major.
    Prerequisite(s): criminal justice major and permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    CRJ 4998 - Capstone Level Project

    (4)
    Qualifies as a capstone experience in the major. Course content to be determined by instructor.
    Prerequisite(s): senior standing and permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    SOC 1000 - Introduction to Sociology

    (4)
    Introduction to the basic concepts of sociology relating to the study of people as participants in group life. Particular attention is given to culture, socialization and self development, social class, and major social institutions. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area. Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity.
  
  •  

    SOC 2010 - Introduction to Methods of Social Research

    (4)
    The collection, organization, analysis and interpretation of social data; elementary techniques of understanding and using quantitative evidence in sociological research.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  
  
  •  

    SOC 2020 - Social Statistics with Computer Applications

    (4)
    Introduction to social statistics emphasizing statistics and data analysis with the aid of computer-based statistical applications. Familiarizes students with the logic of behavioral statistics and the computation and interpretation of statistical analysis.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  and SOC 2010 
  
  •  

    SOC 2100 - Self and Society

    (4)
    Examines the reciprocal relationship between the individual and the group. Emphasizes the social roots of human nature, the self, social interaction, definitions of reality, socialization and social character. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area.
  
  •  

    SOC 2110 - Small Groups

    (4)
    The study of small group relations and the informal understandings, codes and conventions that they generate. Considers dynamics of individuality, leadership, conformity and esprit de corps in a group setting.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200  
  
  •  

    SOC 2200 - Current Social Problems

    (4)
    Presents sociological approaches to analyzing social problems. Particular attention is given to evaluation of the causes and consequences of social problems, as well as of their proposed solutions.
  
  •  

    SOC 2210 - The Sociology of Deviance

    (4)
    An overview of the sociology of deviance, including theoretical approaches, the social construction of deviance, and contemporary empirical research.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200 
  
  •  

    SOC 2220 - Sociology of Mental Illness

    (4)
    Examines social aspects of mental illness, such as impact of social inequalities, role of life stressors and supports, structures of confinement, self-help and human rights movements, narratives of experiences, trends of response to difference and distress.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200 
  
  •  

    SOC 3100 - Interpersonal Relationships

    (4)
    Focuses on interdisciplinary research of social and personal relationships, concentrating on how scholars investigate relational phenomena; the development, maintenance and dissolution of relationships; relational or couple processes; and influences of networks, norms, gender, ethnicity and social structure.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2100 
  
  •  

    SOC 3110 - Human Sexuality

    (4)
    Examines human sexuality from a societal and interpersonal context. Includes methodological and conceptual issues in the study of sexuality; socialization and control of sexuality; sexuality as a social process; the influence of culture, race, and gender; and the social aspects of biological issues. Identical with WGS 3830 .
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2100  or WGS 1000  or WGS 3010 
  
  •  

    SOC 3200 - Population and Society

    (4)
    Examines population change from a national and international perspective. Emphasizes how race, class, and gender influence migration, fertility, and mortality. Provides an overview of how social factors influence population characteristics and affect the social world. Identical with WGS 3860 .
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200  or WGS 1000 
  
  •  

    SOC 3210 - Sociological Perspectives on Aging

    (4)
    Recent sociological perspectives on aging: topics include status of persons approaching and past retirement age, family and community roles and relations, and occupational and political participation.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200 
  
  •  

    SOC 3220 - Social Welfare Policies

    (4)
    Survey of the development of social welfare programs in the U.S. and internationally. Issues related to the problems of poverty, policy analysis and program evaluation related to social welfare in the U.S. and other countries are examined. Identical with SW 3302 . Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SW 2301 
  
  •  

    SOC 3230 - Alcohol, Drugs and Society

    (4)
    Overview of the sociology of substance use and abuse. Includes a review of sociological perspectives, social control of alcohol and drugs, descriptions of alcohol/drug behavior and treatment programs. Also explores ways in which substance abuse problems can be addressed by policy makers, health care professionals and practitioners in the field of substance abuse. Identical with CRJ 3300 .
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100  or SOC 1000 
  
  
  •  

    SOC 3400 - Sociology of Family

    (4)
    A sociological perspective on families, with emphasis on how larger social forces such as laws, education, and the economy influence individual families and families as a social institution. Topics include families throughout history, dating, mate selection, marriage, divorce, family violence, and family policy. Identical with WGS 3813 .
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200 
  
  •  

    SOC 3410 - Family and Community Processes

    (4)
    Introduction to theories, methods, and research on community sociology. Emphasis on prevention and intervention in the community setting. Provides conceptual foundation of the field with an overview of the integration of theory, research, and practice in individual, family and community processes. Identical to WGS 3811 .
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200  or WGS 1000  
  
  •  

    SOC 3420 - Sociology of Religion

    (4)
    An analysis of the social components of religious experience, meaning and behavior; emphasis on the relationship between organized religions and other social institutions and such processes as conversion, commitment, sectarianism, accommodation and secularization.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200  
  
  •  

    SOC 3430 - Sociology of Health and Medicine

    (4)
    The sociological study of medicine and the uses of sociology in medicine, definitions of health and illness, disease and death, health care occupations, medical malpractice, the organization of health services and trends in health and medicine. Identical to HS 3430 .
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200 
  
  •  

    SOC 3440 - Theories of Modern Organizations

    (4)
    Emphasizes degree to which modern society is based upon formal organization. Topics include: theories of human organization, as well as the study of bureaucracies, features of organizations and the effects of organization on American culture.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200 
  
  
  •  

    SOC 3460 - Law and Society

    (4)
    Explores the concept of law and its expression in different societies and cultural contexts. The comparative development of legal institutions is studied in relationship to social structure. The organization of the legal system and profession is studied as related to the capacity of the law to affect behavior as an instrument of social control. Identical with AN 3230 .
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200  or AN 1111  
  
  •  

    SOC 3600 - Social Stratification

    (4)
    In-depth examination of social inequalities. Uses classical theoretical perspectives and contemporary empirical research to examine sources and consequences of resource disparities due to class, race, gender, and other sociological dimensions.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200  
  
  •  

    SOC 3610 - Racial and Ethnic Relations

    (4)
    A study of racial, ethnic and religious groups, particularly those of the U.S., emphasizing their historical development, problems of adjustment and assimilation and contemporary problems and trends. Identical with AN 3127 . Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the knowledge applications integration area. Prerequisite for knowledge applications integration: completion of the general education requirement in the social sciences knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200  or AN 1111  
  
  •  

    SOC 3620 - Sociology of Gender

    (4)
    The social construction of femininity and masculinity through social interaction and social institutions. Focus on education, family, media, politics, economy, and sport. Identical with WGS 3814 .
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200  or WGS 1000  or WGS 3030 
  
  •  

    SOC 3630 - Social Movements

    (4)
    Examines the theoretical and empirical aspects of the origins, mobilization, organization, development and decline of social movements. Will focus on American, international and global social movements.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200  
  
  •  

    SOC 3640 - Urban and Community Sociology

    (4)
    The social structure, culture and ecology of early and contemporary urban communities; institutional responses to the problems of modern urban life.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200 
  
  •  

    SOC 3650 - Gender and Work

    (4)
    Research and theories on the role of gender in trends in employment, labor market opportunities, experiences, and rewards. Exploration of the gendered division of labor in society in both paid and unpaid work. Trends in household work and child care. Identical with WGS 3819 .
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or WGS 1000  
  
  •  

    SOC 3800 - Political Sociology

    (4)
    Sociological factors that influence distribution of power within a society: political communication, maintenance of political consensus, the revolution process, the structure of political parties and the emergence of new states.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200  
  
  •  

    SOC 3820 - Social Control of Mass Media

    (4)
    The major sociological factors that control the informational content of the mass media; differences between the structures and processes of control in the print and electronic sectors of the media.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 
  
  •  

    SOC 3840 - Corrections and Rehabilitative Institutions

    (4)
    Overview of prison and correctional systems in the U.S. Includes reviews of the historical development of corrections and current issues, including sentencing practices, overcrowding, race relations, budget constraints, AIDS and substance abuse. Explores ways in which these problems are addressed by criminal justice practitioners. Identical with CRJ 3224 .
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 2100  or SOC 1000 
  
  
  •  

    SOC 3860 - The Surveillance Society

    (4)
    Explores the development and significance of surveillance as a feature of modern society, how surveillance has changed over time with the development of new technologies, its presence in everyday life and different social institutions and contexts and the degree to which surveillance enhances social participation or social control in society. Identical with CRJ 3342 .
    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 1100  or SOC 1000 
  
  •  

    SOC 3905 - Special Topics in Sociology

    (4)
    Study of a special topic for which no regular course offerings currently exist. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle. May be used for approved course work taken during study abroad.
    Prerequisite(s): sociology major or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    SOC 3930 - Field Experience in Sociology

    (4)
    Field experience in sociology with faculty supervision. An academic project related to the departmental discipline that incorporates student performance in an occupational setting. May not be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): junior/senior standing; 16 credits in sociology, of which at least 8 must be at the 3000/4000 level, and permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    SOC 4000 - Sociological Theory

    (4)
    Major theoretical foundations of sociology, including conceptual contributions of both classic and contemporary theorists. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000  or SOC 2200 
  
  •  

    SOC 4800 - Queer Social Theory

    (4)
    Analysis and overview of queer theories and their contribution to understanding the social construction of identity. Focus on the deconstruction of sexuality and the transgression of conventional gender identity and performance. Identical with WGS 4010 .
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 1000 , WGS 1000 , or WGS 3010 
  
  •  

    SOC 4950 - Internship in Sociology

    (2 OR 4)
    Field placement and supervision of students in a community agency. Introduces interns to employment possibilities while they receive valuable field experience and build community contacts.
    Prerequisite(s): sociology major and instructor permission.
  
  •  

    SOC 4970 - Applying the Sociological Imagination

    (4)
    Revisits themes in race, class, gender, and inequality to explore ways they can be applied beyond the institution of the university. Addresses practical skills related to careers that draw on the sociology degree. Restricted to sociology majors.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 2010 , SOC 2020  or SOC 4000 ; SOC 4000  may be taken concurrent with SOC 4970
  
  •  

    SOC 4996 - Independent Study and Research

    (2 OR 4)
    Directed individual reading and research.
    Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    SOC 4997 - College Teaching Apprenticeship

    (2 OR 4)
    Supervised participation in teaching an undergraduate course in sociology, combined with readings and discussion of teaching objectives and methods appropriate for sociological presentation. May be taken only once for credit toward a major.
    Prerequisite(s): senior sociology major and permission of instructor.

Spanish Language

  
  •  

    SPN 1140 - Introduction to Spanish Language and Culture I

    (4)
    A two-semester sequence in the fundamentals of Spanish and Hispanic cultures. A beginning course. SPN 1140 must be taken first. SPN 1140 or SPN 1150  satisfy the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
  
  •  

    SPN 1150 - Introduction to Spanish Language and Culture II

    (4)
    A two-semester sequence in the fundamentals of Spanish and Hispanic cultures. A beginning course. SPN 1140  must be taken first. SPN 1140  or SPN 1150 satisfy the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
  
  •  

    SPN 1190 - Accelerated Review of Elementary Spanish and Spanish Culture

    (4)
    One-semester course designed to review the fundamentals of Spanish and Spanish culture. Designed for students who have three or more years of previous Spanish experience. Covers the same materials as the two-semester sequence of SPN 1140  and SPN 1150 . Satisfies the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
  
  •  

    SPN 2140 - Second Year Spanish I

    (4)
    A two-semester sequence continuing the work of SPN 1140  and SPN 1150  with the addition of cultural and literary readings. Conducted in Spanish. SPN 2140 or SPN 2150  satisfy the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area or the knowledge application integration, not both. Prerequisite for knowledge application integration: completion of the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): one year of college Spanish or equivalent.
  
  •  

    SPN 2150 - Second Year Spanish II

    (4)
    A two-semester sequence continuing the work of SPN 1140  and SPN 1150  with the addition of cultural and literary readings. Conducted in Spanish. SPN 2140  must be taken first. SPN 2140  or SPN 2150 satisfy the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area or the knowledge application integration area, not both. Prerequisite for knowledge application integration: completion of the university general education requirement in the foreign language and culture knowledge exploration area.
    Prerequisite(s): one year of college Spanish or equivalent.
  
  •  

    SPN 2920 - Directed Readings in Spanish

    (2 OR 4)
    A reading course for non-majors interested in research in a particular area. Approximately 50 hours of reading per credit; one conference weekly with the instructor.
    Prerequisite(s): SPN 2150 
  
  •  

    SPN 3130 - Spanish Phonetics

    (2)
    Group and individual practice in the sound system of Spanish, with specific reference to interference from English. Both written and laboratory work required. Conducted in Spanish.
    Prerequisite(s): SPN 2150 
  
  •  

    SPN 3140 - Spanish Grammar Review

    (4)
    Review of Spanish grammar and syntax through a variety of approaches. Conducted in Spanish.
    Prerequisite(s): SPN 2150 
  
  •  

    SPN 3170 - Intermediate Spanish Conversation and Composition

    (4)
    Intermediate level study in oral and written communication. Conducted in Spanish.
    Prerequisite(s): SPN 2150 ; SPN 3140  highly recommended.
  
  •  

    SPN 3500 - Latin American Civilization

    (4)
    Historical approach to Latin American culture and civilization, with emphasis on geography, social structure, philosophical thought, music, art and popular culture. Conducted in Spanish.
    Prerequisite(s): SPN 2150  and SPN 3140  highly recommended.
 

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